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Carriage and restraint of small children in aircraft CAAP 235-2(2)


Thruster87
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10.7 CASA and Standards Australia collaborated to modify AS/NZS 1754 to consider the CRS fitment in aircraft. CRSs certified to AS/NZS 1754:2013 and onward, can meet additional criteria relevant to use onboard aircraft. These criteria include installation with only the use of the aircraft seat belt. Such CRSs have labelling similar to that in Figure 1 below. CRSs certified to AS/NZS 1754 that do not contain this label are still acceptable for use onboard aircraft provided there is an approved means to attach the top tether strap. See section 11 of this CAAP for further details on specific installation details.upload_2015-2-17_16-41-2.png.24f38b747de5476296fcd0e8377c51ef.png Was not aware of this.

 

 

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I tend to agree.. If they panic you still have to fly it. What if they open the door and take the harness off? In this game you have to be very careful who occupies that other seat in your aircraft. Unless you can do without your house. Nev

 

 

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True Nev, but I was thinking more along the lines of never taking a pillion on a motorcycle unless they are old enough to understand the risks.

 

Motorcycle is a bit different in that I never wanted a pillion, ever, but always welcome a consenting adult 065_evil_grin.gif.2006e9f40863555e5894f7036698fb5d.gif in the cockpit.

 

 

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You have to be over 8 years of age to pillion or be in a sidecar NOW. I have no idea what statistics were used as a basis of that.. Do you mean you never wanted to carry a pillion or never wanted to be on the back yourself? A bad pillion can be a bit dangerous. (leaning the wrong way etc). I don't trust anyone to be on the back of unless it is half way around a track to save me walking. Nev

 

 

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Sect 271 (TORUM- Road Rules) regs 2009

 

  1. (5A) The rider of a motorbike must not ride with a passenger (except a passenger in a sidecar) unless the passenger is at least 8 years old.
     
    Maximum penalty—20 penalty units
     
    Nev,
    A sidecar is exempt (at least in Qld) & 5 states are supposed to be the same under the national road rules programme.
     
     

 

 

 

 

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You have to be over 8 years of age to pillion or be in a sidecar NOW. I have no idea what statistics were used as a basis of that.. Do you mean you never wanted to carry a pillion or never wanted to be on the back yourself? A bad pillion can be a bit dangerous. (leaning the wrong way etc). I don't trust anyone to be on the back of unless it is half way around a track to save me walking. Nev

One of the rare occasions I was ever a pillion it was on the back of my own bike (VFR750 at the time). And, to make it a bit more interesting I was sitting behind a big bloke (an instructor) doing a StayUpright course at Eastern Creek. He was showing me how to ride properly, lines to take and lean angles. He said he'd do the first lap at about half revs and the second one at 3/4 revs. Off we went . . . out of the pits to Turn 2, he leaned in and I leaned out. By turn 4 I had worked up the courage to sit upright and not lean into or out of the corner. By the start of the second lap my confidence was way up and I was going with him. He had an amazing touch (with the bike) and showed me lean angles two-up that I wouldn't have considered solo. He was so smooth it was like a revelation as to what was possible.

My next experience was with a mate on the back at a Honda ride day at Phillip Is. He rode a Kawasaki and they wouldn't let him in the gate with it so he had to come to the pits on the back of mine. He was a good rider and OK as pillion for the short run to the pits.

 

I did a few laps on some of Honda's machines and then during a break he said he'd like to have a look at the track so we agreed I'd take him around slowly on the back of a CB1000 (naked bike). He said that since I never took pillions and I'd never ridden a CB1000 before anywhere let alone around Phillip Is, he'd appreciate the "slowly" part.

 

Off we went . . . all going well enough apart from the suspension grounding out around a few corners and pegs scraping here and there. On previous laps, I'd come onto the Gardiner Straight at something over the old ton and wind out to around 220 km/h down the straight before freaking out and grabbing some brakes for the run down thru Doohan. There was a strong headwind up the straight that day and it made 220 km/h feel like 300 and you had to be tucked down behind the screen. This time with Steve on the back, on the naked CB1000, about halfway down the straight, I was getting a bit weary form the wind and so leaned forward - a lot. Poor old Steve went from 0 km/h to more than 200 km/h in an instant. Almost lost him off the back. Funny, he still hasn't thanked me for that one.

 

 

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My wife is a good pillion (you don't know she's there. Just stays with the bike). Have done the Thunderbolt Way.. Gloucester Walcha Wauchope, run (Highly recommended). She's been riding bikes for over 40 years. Nev

 

 

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I'm a bit of a control freak and don't like being a pillion pax at all. (Maybe bad memories but we will leave that alone) my cousin (same age and size as me) and I hired a two person bike to peddle around rottnest years ago, I started on the back and we just couldn't get a rhythm happening, we nearly pranged a couple of times until we swapped places. He had absolutely no fear and was a perfect passenger (unlike me), I could hardly even tell there were two of us, we had no further trouble and even managed a couple of downhill standing sprints (yes I know it was crazy but awesome fun)

 

 

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I have done half a million k's or somewhere thereabouts with her indoors on the back. She is and always has been the perfect pillion. On her first ride I gave her the same brief that I give everyone. Sit with your bum in the middle of the seat. Do not lean away from me, do not lean with me just sit upright. If you need to wiggle your bum or move out of line warn me first. She listened and learnt and has never been a problem.

 

She sat on the wing for 14 hours once, never even got off when we stopped for fuel. Just ordered a packet of lollies and a bottle of lemonade as I went in to pay. Sad thing is she has gotten her own licence now and rides herself so I have no-one to rub my back or feed me lollies.

 

Some people can and some can't. Me I have never been on the back and probably never will. I trust me.

 

 

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My wife is a good pillion (you don't know she's there. Just stays with the bike). Have done the Thunderbolt Way.. Gloucester Walcha Wauchope, run (Highly recommended). She's been riding bikes for over 40 years. Nev

Same here, my missus is a excellent pillion. She's been riding on the back of my bikes for the last 15 years.

 

 

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My wife is a good pillion (you don't know she's there. Just stays with the bike). Have done the Thunderbolt Way.. Gloucester Walcha Wauchope, run (Highly recommended). She's been riding bikes for over 40 years. Nev

Some brilliant Roads there, Nev. Had some great days on those, particularly up through Gingers Creek on the Wauchope - Walcha run. May have even exceeded the speed limit but not sure as I didn't have time to look at the speedo ;-)

 

 

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The boss and I always argue over our favorite bike roads. Mine is the Oxley Highway (for its technical content) with smoko at Gingers Creek, hers is the Great Alpine Way in Victorias high country. It can be absolutely glorious on the right day, and we have scored the perfect day for it a couple of times now. Riding through there when the cloud is below the mountain tops is about as close to perfection as I am ever likely to see.

 

 

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Some years ago, my mate Wayne ( sadly now deceased - no, not in a bike bingle. . .) gave me a back seat ride after my vfr750 died 90 miles from base on a Sunday afternoon rideout,. . . I got on the back of his ZZR 1100 and he pulled away so fast that my legs shot upwards and he grabbed them under his arms and gave me a" laid back" run down the road for about half a mile. . . . . after which I opted for a more leisurely lift the rest of the way behind my Brother on his "Bonny" . . . . . I can't say I'm a fan of the rear seat either. . . .

 

But back to topic,. . . . ( ! ) A youngish passenger grabbed the throttle in our Mk 1 X'Air, and pulled it right back, ( I obviously was not holding it as firmly as I SHOULD HAVE. . ) trying to adjust his seat on T/o. . . . Yes,. . I KNOW, . . "Expect the unexpected" it was in no way deliberate, and I HAD briefed the lad, who was a 14 yr old air cadet. . . . short of removing the right seat throttle, which would not be good for syndicate training / revalidation flights with instructors etc,. . . . I decided against carrying kids after that.

 

 

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That post sounds really exciting doesn't it ?,. . . . can I just mention that the aircraft had only JUST lifted off,. . . to about 6 feet AGL ( ours only took 180 FEET of runway in a good wind. . . . )and the removal of power resulted in an instant takeoff abort. No accident,. . .no injuries,. . .just a severe adrenaline episode. . . . . . . the "Kid" ( eight years down the line ) responsible now flies a Foxbat with his Dad. . . . so, alls well, and all that. . . . . but I still won't take young people up unless it's in the back of a PA28 or C182 with parents firmly in charge . . . .

 

Phil

 

 

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Good to see a couple other ex-VFR owners out there! Aren't they a bulletproof bike. I had two, an '86 and a '93 (I think). Best road down here is Grasstree Hill Rd over Sugarloaf Hill and through to Richmond. Nice bends all up and down the hill then a nice flat 3km straight where I wound it out to 200+ on a few occasions...

 

I got my first VFR when I was 18, the only thing I'd ridden before that was an XL185 road/trail - so the weight took a bit of getting used to. Remember taking my girlfriend for her first ride, I impressed the hell out of her by proudly leaping on the VFR and falling straight over the other side with the bike coming down on top of me. Amazingly she still rode with me!

 

Sometimes thought that would make a nice aircraft engine! Never had a problem with mine, as long as they had oil & fuel they just never stopped.

 

 

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