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Hi, I was wondering if people knew about the V speeds for the Foxbat, please. I downloaded the POH and am trying to get my head around it in plenty of time for ordering and arrival. Some of the info is as follows.

 

Short Field Takeoff (Full Flaps)

 

========================

 

Rotate at 22 kts.

 

Liftoff at 35 kts.

 

Accelerate close to the ground to 54 kts, then climb away.

 

Stall Speed

 

=========

 

One stage of flaps 32 kts

 

No flaps 42 kts.

 

It does not seem likely to me that it would be a good idea to rotate 3 tks above stall speed. I imagine that the stall speed for full flaps would be lower than the stall speed for one stage of flaps. Does anyone know what it is? I will be getting a Kelpie so I imagine some of the speeds will be a bit lower.

 

These seem to be the book numbers FWIW.

 

V Speeds

 

Vr (short field) = 22

 

Vr (normal field) = 22

 

Vso = 32

 

Vlof (short field, 2 flaps) = 35

 

Vs = 42

 

Vlof (normal field, flaps) = 44

 

Vbg (flaps) = 49

 

Vx = 49 (+ 5 in turbulence)

 

Vat (short field) = 49

 

“V2min” = 54

 

Vlof (no flaps) = 54

 

Vy = 54 (+ 5 in turbulence)

 

Vbg(no flaps) = 54

 

Vat (normal field) = 54

 

Vfe = 80

 

Vra = 99

 

Va = 101

 

Vne = 124

 

Other Speeds

 

Cruise in rough air 54 to 99

 

Approach 54 to 80

 

Balked landing 54

 

Cruise 1000 ft 4000 rpm 59

 

Cruise 1000 ft 5000 rpm 87

 

Cruise at 5400 rpm 97

 

Top speed at sea level 99

 

Wind Speeds

 

Maximum crosswind 14

 

No flaps takeoff/landing 16

 

 

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That 3 knots above stall was for short field so not something to do all the time. Also that was with 2 stages of flap so probably still works out to 1.3 times stall speed.

 

I don't know much about the foxbat but I do find the 99 knots rough air speed to sound a bit high?

 

 

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By would you be wanting to check this by correspondence, and on a forum at that? What happened to the Instructor who trained you? Or was there one?

Why would anyone ask anything on a forum! 008_roflmao.gif.692a1fa1bc264885482c2a384583e343.gif

The main reason is IMHO if you go to the source and get the proper info the conversation is over in a matter of minutes whereas on a forum we can have a variety of facts and drag it out for much longer and we all enjoy interaction so that is obviously the way to do it! (Not meaning this thread in particular but speaking generally)

 

 

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I don't know much about the foxbat but I do find the 99 knots rough air speed to sound a bit high?

Good luck getting a Foxbat up to 99 knots in any weather. A Vixxen maybe but a Foxbat not likely.

 

 

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By would you be wanting to check this by correspondence, and on a forum at that? What happened to the Instructor who trained you? Or was there one?

I did 20 hours 20 years ago. No instructor yet. I'm just learning stuff so that I can concentrate on learning to fly when I get to learn to fly.

 

 

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I did 20 hours 20 years ago. No instructor yet. I'm just learning stuff so that I can concentrate on learning to fly when I get to learn to fly.

The POH is the starting point, once you decide where you are going to train, the instructor will give you the changest. I found radio changes the hardest to relearn so the most distracting.

 

 

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Not sure where you found the POH to get those numbers.

 

The first one I found on the web relates to the Ukraine and speeds are given in mph, kph and knots and maybe this has confused you. However, even this gives a clear manoeuvring limit of 89 knots.

 

The Ukraine POH is for an aircraft with 90 litres of fuel, not the 114 that is standard for the current Australian Foxbat.

 

Interestingly it is approved for Night VFR ops.

 

I suggest you look at the Kelpie specifications on the Foxbat Australia site as a good starting point.

 

If you have or are close to placing an order you should get in touch with Foxbat Australia for a current Australian POH.

 

As to those doubting the 99 knots, possible though not usual in level flight. I would say 95 knots is a more probable fast cruise.

 

I enjoyed a 2007 Foxbat for 10 years. It was a 544 kg MTOW aircraft with 92 litres of fuel. I usually planned cross country flights at 95 knots and found that to be pretty much on the money!

 

(My replacement Foxbat is presently nearing the Suez Canal. I'll let you know how it goes in a couple of months.)

 

 

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I did 20 hours 20 years ago. No instructor yet. I'm just learning stuff so that I can concentrate on learning to fly when I get to learn to fly.

Just make sure after you get your licence you keep on learning

Once you think you know it all it’s time to give it up

 

 

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Well, your stall speed varies with the actual weight you are. If you are built like a jockey with near empty tanks you actual weight will be quite a bit different to max permitted weight. This type of plane flys better with weight in it. Nev.

 

 

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Not sure where you found the POH to get those numbers.The first one I found on the web relates to the Ukraine and speeds are given in mph, kph and knots and maybe this has confused you. However, even this gives a clear manoeuvring limit of 89 knots.

The Ukraine POH is for an aircraft with 90 litres of fuel, not the 114 that is standard for the current Australian Foxbat.

 

Interestingly it is approved for Night VFR ops.

 

I suggest you look at the Kelpie specifications on the Foxbat Australia site as a good starting point.

 

If you have or are close to placing an order you should get in touch with Foxbat Australia for a current Australian POH.

 

As to those doubting the 99 knots, possible though not usual in level flight. I would say 95 knots is a more probable fast cruise.

 

I enjoyed a 2007 Foxbat for 10 years. It was a 544 kg MTOW aircraft with 92 litres of fuel. I usually planned cross country flights at 95 knots and found that to be pretty much on the money!

 

(My replacement Foxbat is presently nearing the Suez Canal. I'll let you know how it goes in a couple of months.)

Hi. Thank you for your reply. I got the POH from the Foxbat Australia website in May 2017. I went back again just now and it is different. I have downloaded the updated POH. As far as I can tell, maneuvering speed and rough air speed are the same at 89 kts.

 

 

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