Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 59
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

A battery life hint for those with Skyecho units   Don't leave them on charge their whole life. Charge it up before you use it. Don't charge it up and put it in the cupboard for 3 months. 

Yes it does Jack. The Skyecho is only 20watts output not 250 watts so its only local aircraft to aircraft at low levels...below 5000ft. Somewhere between 10 and 40nm they say depending on where you st

Thanks Graham. I’ll show you a few Air-to-Air examples in a moment. But we have a network of amateur built and maintained ADS-B receivers in the UK (some are for UK system called Pilot Aware and some

Posted Images

24 minutes ago, rhtrudder said:

Fitted up skyecho, all registered, turned on , send young bloke up and raced inside to see him on ozrunways  but not to be seen , could see other aircraft, what am I missing 

Did you have a SkyEcho connected to your tablet as well? Mine is working well at displaying ADSB traffic (ozrunways android) and presumably they can see me. Given the 20 mile range I am showing on flightradar24 quite alot.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

REMEMBER  to be seen on flight radar 24, you need to be seen from their base stations !

 

And there is some varying input- some receivers look at the 978 MHz UAT, others the Mode-S Extended Squitter (1090 MHz), , others -both.

 

Thruster88- I actually want to talk with you about getting a project going to access to some hills around the central west and putting some ADSB receivers on them. solar powered, costs a couple of hundred bucks to establish....can talk tot flight radar24 etc..

 

Edited by RFguy
Link to post
Share on other sites

Range on the skyecho with 20 watts in the sky echo and internal antenna will be only be able 3x less than the theoretical maximum.

About -  300-450 km approx. MUST BE RADIO LINE OF SIGHT 

 

Recently I have been running some numbers to see where the nearby SSRs to the central west, what height they'll be able to see us.  This is for Mode A, Mode C transponders.

Mt Bobbara (Young)

3000'

 

 

 

 

 

Clipboard01.jpg

Edited by RFguy
Link to post
Share on other sites

Skyecho is good for about 20nm I have been flying with one for a while. You see other skyechos pop up intermittently at around 25nm and usually steady under 20nm.

If they are flying with Ozrunways they go from light to a darker blue ADSB has priority (dark blue) when signal is strong enough.

20 nm won't trigger base stations very often.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is possible it has been intentionally limited.  

 

and  that either 1) Uavionix  does not want to canabalize its higher end products

2) they licensed the tech from someone , with the same caveat as (1)

3) Or, that was the deal with the devil , (regulator) - a limited range.

 

I'll do some research on where ozrunways gets its info from.  

Many ADSB receivers will actually be Mode S on 1090, not 978 UAT.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ozrunways talks over the mobile network so you can  see other Ozrunways traffic if you and them have mobile service.

Skyecho is a low power portable ADSB device 20w output is fine and 20nm is more than enough to assist in being seen by other ADSB in traffic.

It was never intended to be in competition with the commercial IFR 200w transmitters.

CASA has done a great job allowing us to use these cheap low power ADSB's for VFR they add a large safety factor for a low cost expecting it to be the same as the 10k plus systems is not reasonable IMHO.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As with Pilot Aware and Flarm, SkyEcho is predominately a collision avoidance system between aircraft in the air. CAA refer to these devices as conspicuity aids and are currently offering a 50% rebate when purchased.  Each operator enters their aircrafts stall speed, and ident hex number.  Below that GPS derived stall speed ADSB out ceases and the aircraft will not be seen. 

 

Owners of aircraft should not play with them in their car with ADSB out enabled as they will be 'seen' as an aircraft 'flying' along the motorway when driving faster then the stall speed of their aircraft.

 

I did not know that, unlike the US,  ATC or radar services in the UK currently do not have ADSB receivers that could receive and ident an ADSB out equipped aircraft.  Without a mode C transponder in my aircraft I was hoping ADSB out would allow me to be identified and transit controlled airspace ...but that is not the case.   

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A shame CASA isn't subsidising SkyEcho.   

Has anyone had any experience with PingUSB?  Obviously it is ADSB-In only so you need to be looking at Avplan/Ozrunways on a tablet to make use of it, and of course you are not 'visible' to other aircraft.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SGM said:

A shame CASA isn't subsidising SkyEcho.   

Has anyone had any experience with PingUSB?  Obviously it is ADSB-In only so you need to be looking at Avplan/Ozrunways on a tablet to make use of it, and of course you are not 'visible' to other aircraft.

I'm using the ping. Works well. (Already have mode S adsb-out transponder)

I can pickup aircraft 100nm away in a straight line.

The only issue is that without an external antenna, parts of the aircraft mask reception.

As I have it on the front windscreen, everything in front of me is shown but behind me aircraft "come and go" a bit.

In reference to the opening question, the ping does pick up my own aircraft.....

Overall, I think it does help with situational awareness. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

6 hours ago, jmal said:

 

 

I did not know that, unlike the US,  ATC or radar services in the UK currently do not have ADSB receivers that could receive and ident an ADSB out equipped aircraft.  Without a mode C transponder in my aircraft I was hoping ADSB out would allow me to be identified and transit controlled airspace ...but that is not the case.   

 

 

According to CASA's   ADVISORY CIRCULAR AC 91-23v1.0  it is the case in Australia that SkyEcho type devices are/will be visible to ATC, within range.

 

 

"6.3 Integrated TABS device 6.3.1 Aircraft operated to the VFR can use an integrated TABS device. TABS devices were designed primarily for those aircraft in USA that were not required to comply with the FAA's stringent ADS-B requirements but want to be ‘seen’ by ADS-B and TCAS. In Australia, it is expected that these devices will provide a level of visibility to ATC as well, for situational awareness purposes"

 

And based on some earlier discussion we had on this on this forum, it seems that the range will probably be a lot more than the nominal 20 NM from station.

 

 

Anyone on here in ATC who knows more about this?

 

Edited by Garfly
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, jmal said:

I was hoping ADSB out would allow me to be identified and transit controlled airspace ...but that is not the case.   

In Australia, skyecho is not allowed to be used in controlled airspace.

It must be a Mode S transponder.... 

 

Perhaps the UK, being substantially smaller, primary and secondary radar do the job?

As I understand it, most of the UK airspace is "controlled" anyway.

Whereas most of Aus is class G. 

https://www.airservicesaustralia.com/about-us/projects/ads-b/ads-b-coverage/

Edited by Downunder
Link to post
Share on other sites

But at least ATC should be able to identify you in times of trouble.  I wonder if they'll get around to accepting these devices for the purposes of flight following. I guess they'd want to see how they work in practice first.

Also there are times when you need/want to advise ATC of your position/intentions when skirting OCTA, so it would be nice to know that you are conspicuous to them.

 

This VFR route south west of Canberra between Cotter and Tharwa is an example of being required to advise even OCTA.

 

 

1589788379_COTR-THW1.thumb.png.0456231f4150c43b948b5e9147799fea.png

 

COTR-THW2.thumb.png.96dd799bd6ea586b3f398f58bf9e22a6.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mode S extended squitter transmits with the DF17 protocol. IE mode S transponder with ES-ADSB-OUT)

 

ADSB OUT devices transmit with DF17 or DF18 protocol, usually. DF18 is also transmitted on 978 by UAT capable transmitters. 

there are a few sub classes of ADSB messages.

 

Maybe the ATC doesnt decode ADSB or broadcast  ext-sq,ie  only decodes interrogated sensors .

Have to do some reading

 

@Downunder, where did you find this information you quoted-
"In Australia, skyecho is not allowed to be used in controlled airspace."????

- a link please.??????

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

CASA, details that restriction in ADVISORY CIRCULAR AC 91-23v1.0:

(In this table alongside "Integrated TABS; SIL>1")

 

 

 

1657248005_CASACIRC..thumb.png.1d10d9ff4ee018d5c51475d4556a9d1c.png

 

Edited by Garfly
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's my understanding also. 

 

There is some concern that ADSB devices (non interrogated, unlike a Mode S 1090ES) will generate alot of extra signal clutter and congestion. Hence, that is why there is the use of ADSB on 978 MHz, (IE away from the busy 1090 MHz used for Mode A,C,S)

 

The Mode S system can tell a sensor in an aircraft to shut up, also. useful for reducing congestion.

Generally , you want a Mode S 1090ES+ADSB mode transponder for lurking around in CTA/ CTZ.

 

Not sure if SkyEcho performs functions of TCAS etc, or emulation. I think it is only a pure ADSB-IN  (displaying other aircraft 1090ES-ADSB transmissions) and ADSB-OUT broadcasts. TCAS systems actually interrogate each other.

 

I am absolutely positive that ATC can see ADSB-OUT transmissions from SKyEcho. There isnt much difference with 1090ES transmission.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am led to believe yes you can been seen by ATC because that is why you need the hex code for it as it goes into the system so you can be seen. TCAS in another aircraft will not see you apparently as it is the type that it is here

 

The restricted power and radiation of the Skyecho will drop in and out of the ATC ground stations but they will still register on their system because you are outputting a ID that they give to you

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, RFguy said:

@Downunder, where did you find this information you quoted-
"In Australia, skyecho is not allowed to be used in controlled airspace."????

- a link please.??????

A quick search. VFR aircraft- a rule of thumb.....

 

Screenshot_20201210-164246.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark is correct

The only difference between what a ModeS transponder with ADSB-OUT (1090ES) generates (DF17 frame) , and what the SKyEcho transmits (DF18)  is that the format flag is set such that it can inform the receiver that the device cannot be interrogated.

 

WHile it's possible ATC might have their equipment set to deliberately ignore DF18 frames, I cannot think of why they would...

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And Downunder, I think you have interpreted that page the wrong way.

 

What it means for VFR  : 

- you must have a transponder in CTA (Mode A, C or Mode S)

- new transponders MUST be Mode S. you cannot put a old A/C transponder in if your old one fails

 

- EC devices like Skyecho DO NOT REPLACE the transponder requirement for CTA CTZ

Edited by RFguy
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's about "quality control ". 

You can't just let any random device into controlled airspace....... where there are potentially hundreds of lives on the line.

Edited by Downunder
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...