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shafs64

thruster steep climb

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Looks to me to be way exceeding the angle of attack on that wing. Once you've exceeded AoA, there isn't any lift so there isn't any climb - it's just momentum vs gravity. Which is why, as you point out, airspeed drops so quickly.

 

Personally, I wouldn't go flying with someone reknown for hotdogging at 100 feet AGL.

 

 

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... it's just momentum vs gravity. Which is why, as you point out, airspeed drops so quickly.

Plenty of GA pilots converting to little RA types are caught by the shortage of momentum. Thrusters have so much drag and so little inertia they are the worst type in which to commit tomfoolery.

 

 

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Yes it is showing the climb! but is the point, the guy is climbing too steeply or that he`s stalling at the top of the climb or that a climb that steep is more hazardous than a normal climb?....It appears to me that he`s simply done a steep climb and lowered the nose at the top of the climb. Doesn`t appear to stall!

 

The real problem would occur if the engine was to fail at too low an altitude to get the nose down before the stall.

 

Keep in mind that this also applies to STOL aircraft that climb out extremely steeply.

 

 

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Angle of attack is not a problem until he starts to run out of airspeed at the top of climb. If he had more horsepower he could have continued the climb angle at a safe airspeed. Don't confuse climb angle with AoA to the relative wind.

 

What he was doing there was trading excess airspeed for altitude.

 

 

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Plenty of GA pilots converting to little RA types are caught by the shortage of momentum. Thrusters have so much drag and so little inertia they are the worst type in which to commit tomfoolery.

Have committed much tomfoolery in said type. Really good fun too.

 

Low drag and high inertia aircraft are the ones that usually leave smoking craters

 

 

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better stop doing max angle climbs in the Savannah out of Bankstown then, i like to be 1000 ft by the end of the runway when surrounded by suburbia.

 

What he was doing there was trading excess airspeed for altitude

exactly.

 

 

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Seemed pretty much within limits. Trades speed (inertia) for height (Potential energy) That aircraft must have had a good set of skins or was fairly light, because it is hard to get much excess airspeed to trade for height with most Thrusters. One time that would have been called a "zoom" climb. Climbing out at a high pitch attitude and minimum speed (which was not actually the case here) is not really safe as there is a height below which you will damage the plane and probably give yourself a spinal injury IF the engine fails. This is what the concern over LP aircraft is about. Once you comprehend what it involves and bunt over without delay, you will find what the required technique is and what the plane can and can't do. Simple physics. Train for steep gliding turns too which is good for direction change with minimum loss of height. Nev

 

 

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Yes it is showing the climb! but is the point, the guy is climbing too steeply or that he`s stalling at the top of the climb or that a climb that steep is more hazardous than a normal climb?....It appears to me that he`s simply done a steep climb and lowered the nose at the top of the climb. Doesn`t appear to stall!

The real problem would occur if the engine was to fail at too low an altitude to get the nose down before the stall.

 

Keep in mind that this also applies to STOL aircraft that climb out extremely steeply.

I should of put bleeding off airspeed.

 

 

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Have committed much tomfoolery in said type. Really good fun too.Low drag and high inertia aircraft are the ones that usually leave smoking craters

Fair enough, Ozzie. I should have been more specific about which tomfoolery; the near-ground type especially.

 

You probably have a point about the low drag/high inertia ones leaving more holes. At least with a Thruster it's easier to be a few minutes ahead of the aircraft!

 

 

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One must remember back in the early days you were not allowed to fly high so one became quite adapt at low level flying. Shrubs in the wheels and grass in the wing tips type stuff. Racing against trial bikes was good fun. Modern day pilots have to play with a different set of rules. Pity really. Flying high drag aircraft with a small speed range right to it's limits is a great learning tool. IE I would not even think of doing tomfoolery stuff in a king air.

 

 

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For a high RoC starting with nearly zero inertia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLYhW6ZB4bI. And when the string breaks, you push over REALLY hard and don't do a damn thing with either stick or rudder until you have airspeed and 1g back on the bum, then you start thinking about your options. Any winch-rated glider pilot has to be trained to recover from a cable break at any height in the launch, and the only thing that one gets is bruised knuckles from jamming the stick into the panel..

 

 

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That is just a zoom and it can't be sustained for long in a Thruster. From a straight and level stall in a Thruster, it just becomes a very high rate of descent, fairly level and would not be fatal if carried right down to the ground. They were forgiving for an unwary pilot.

 

 

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Right from the start we put large control surfaces and substantial wash out and diheadral.gave good handling and control well into the stall.

 

 

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That is just a zoom and it can't be sustained for long in a Thruster. From a straight and level stall in a Thruster, it just becomes a very high rate of descent, fairly level and would not be fatal if carried right down to the ground. They were forgiving for an unwary pilot.

I wouldn`t say that!... Where`s the evidence to sugest that a stall carried right down to the ground would not be fatal,regardles of how forgiving the aircraft is?....There are enough variables that no two situations would be exactly the same!...A stall taken all the way to the ground is a crash and therefore potentially fatal.

 

Frank.

 

 

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I try to stall them 1 cm from the ground and all the way down from there, in some of 'em. Nev

Some of use have more bravado....I would do it from TEN centimetres.037_yikes.gif.f44636559f7f2c4c52637b7ff2322907.gif

 

Alan.

 

 

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I try to stall them 1 cm from the ground and all the way down from there, in some of 'em. Nev

Yeah! Goodonya Nev.....I suppose without a specified altitude, my comment about the stall was fairly ambiguous!

 

Frank.

 

 

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