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Choosing a first plane... too many options.


jimmyloud
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Still in training raa ATM. Definitely got the flying bug. Looking for a good starter plane to finish my hours in but will also serve me well as i progress. so many unreal options availible its hard (almost impossible) to chose

 

 

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foxbat a22. I like highwings and would prefer something that is short field capable. Even though im no where near doing stol's, i would like to learn in time. Im loving the foxbat but they are def at the higher end of the price scale.

 

 

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When I consider my weight, my wife's weight and the weight of the aircraft, it does not leave me a lot of options if I actually hope to take of with some fuel in the tanks. The Foxbat A22LS does actually have one of the best carrying capacities of all the aircraft that I have looked at. It is one of the reasons that I chose to learn in the Foxbat.

 

 

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When I consider my weight, my wife's weight and the weight of the aircraft, it does not leave me a lot of options if I actually hope to take of with some fuel in the tanks. The Foxbat A22LS does actually have one of the best carrying capacities of all the aircraft that I have looked at. It is one of the reasons that I chose to learn in the Foxbat.

And one of the reasons I chose the Foxbat too.

Others are, large roomy, good fuel capacity for range, large strong undercarriage (upgraded tundra tyre option), STOL, slow stall, easy to wash off speed with the thick wing and it's an aircraft that doesn't get ahead of low time pilots.

 

Second hand in the mag for 60 odd thou. And I don't think I've seen one yet where the hours don't match the airframe hours.......

 

 

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And one of the reasons I chose the Foxbat too.Others are, large roomy, good fuel capacity for range, large strong undercarriage (upgraded tundra tyre option), STOL, slow stall, easy to wash off speed with the thick wing and it's an aircraft that doesn't get ahead of low time pilots.

Second hand in the mag for 60 odd thou. And I don't think I've seen one yet where the hours don't match the airframe hours.......

Yep all of those things. An its a lot of fun to learn in as well. Well it has been so far. And when I do learn enough to be able to have a bit of a look around the view from the cabin would have to be second to none. And the Rotax motor. (But you did say that in a polite way didn't you 001_smile.gif.2cb759f06c4678ed4757932a99c02fa0.gif)

 

 

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How tall are you? VG model(544Kg) Savannahs do all the same things Downunder mentioned, in an all aluminium plane and don't seem to make 50 odd thousand. If you are a tall bloke like me you would need to hold out for an XL/S(600Kg) model.

 

 

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  • 6 months later...

Jimmy and Geoff,

 

You two are 6 months or so ahead of me. Funnily enough we have asked the same questions. I'm now training in a Savannah S and finally starting to enjoy it. Light, high wing, STOL seems to be my preference too. The more I dig around the more nice planes I see. I think folding wings and trailer could also be good, not just for hangarage, but also for a low stress around the country slowly sight seeing tour once I retire. There are a few contenders there, but I think the Gazelles on offer are too far gone to be worth the trouble. Any I've enquired about have had engines way beyond TBO and when I checked with Bert Flood there is no "on condition" option whatever the vendors or their LAME have to say.

 

 

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The more exposure you get, and that takes time, the better your ultimate decision will be about a plane for you. Any money you think you might save with training in it is small bikkies to what you may lose if your choice isn't right for you. Nev

 

 

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I think folding wings and trailer could also be good, not just for hangarage, but also for a low stress around the country slowly sight seeing tour once I retire.

A few threads on here about trailering. Not as easy as it seems but still viable for some. Do your research....

 

 

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I think folding wings and trailer could also be good, not just for hangarage, but also for a low stress around the country slowly sight seeing tour once I retire.

Have a look at a few aluminium boats that have been trailered around Australia before you get too excited about doing it to a plane. There are a lot of bumps in the road on a full circuit.

 

 

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I did one long trip and set it up carefully. I won't do it again. It scares the hell out of me. The blast of air from trucks going the opposite way, Bumps and the possibility of chafing.

 

Fully enclose and sit on foam, and make sure all your cables etc don't rub on anything. I guess it's possible to make sure there is no possibility of damage, but it isn't easy. Nev

 

 

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Looking for a good starter plane to finish my hours in

Just remember that it will need to be a factory built aircraft for you to complete your Pilot Certificate in it

 

I think folding wings and trailer could also be good, not just for hangarage, but also for a low stress around the country slowly sight seeing tour once I retire.

A trike is probably one of the more practical solutions to the problems of a dragging a plane round the country

Cheers

 

John

 

 

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Just remember that it will need to be a factory built aircraft for you to complete your Pilot Certificate in it

It doesn't need to be factory built for the owner to be trained in the aircraft, you do however need an instructor willing to train in your aircraft.

 

 

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Jimmy and Geoff,You two are 6 months or so ahead of me. Funnily enough we have asked the same questions. I'm now training in a Savannah S and finally starting to enjoy it. Light, high wing, STOL seems to be my preference too. The more I dig around the more nice planes I see. I think folding wings and trailer could also be good, not just for hangarage, but also for a low stress around the country slowly sight seeing tour once I retire. There are a few contenders there, but I think the Gazelles on offer are too far gone to be worth the trouble. Any I've enquired about have had engines way beyond TBO and when I checked with Bert Flood there is no "on condition" option whatever the vendors or their LAME have to say.

MM After 6 months I still had the same problem. Indecision about what to buy. The problem that I had was that I loved everything that I flew in and wanted them all. Obviously that was not possible and rather than spend a lot of money on something that I may outgrow in 12 months I went for a cheaper option. I also originally wanted a factory built so I could put it online. Many people tried to talk me out of that one but the most convincing argument was the day the Minister for War and Finance said to me I thought this was supposed to be all about you. Obviously once I decided that 19 rego's were in the mix, that made the choices even harder. So I finally decided on something cheap that I would not lose to much on if in 12 months I wanted something else.

 

I bought an X-Air Hanuman. So why settle for the Hanuman?

 

Well even though I had lost a fair bit of weight, carrying capacity is a huge consideration for me. The Hanuman has that. Even with full tanks is still has 215kgs to spare.

 

They are very well priced.

 

They are very solid. When you walk around it and look at things they scream professionalism in the design. Of course that needs to be carried through to the builder but it is a very good starting point.

 

It has a very large cabin equally as roomy as the Foxbat.

 

And it handles very well. It is very similar to the Foxbat to fly, but you do need to be more aware when landing her. She does glide well but once you get down to the flare point you do need to be close to the ground. Once you flare it really does tend to slow down very quickly.

 

She has 3 stage flaps but really is happy to take off without flaps and land with one stage. I have about 20 hours in her now and have not yet been game to put the 3rd stage of flaps out. I think if you did she would be almost happy to stop in midair. Unlike the Foxbat, when you give some flaps, the nose does not tend to drop to maintain speed she just seems to sink faster with a very similar attitude. I am not sure about that yet, I am still coming to grips with it.

 

It also has the folding wings, as do all the Hanumans which is nice to have I guess if you need it for storage or trailering but I haven't folded them yet and if I can keep it in a hangar where I don't need to I will be happy.

 

OK so for the negatives.

 

Performance. She cruises at 80 knots no probs so that is not a negative.

 

Mine has the Jabiru 2200 motor. 80hp (supposedly) I think if mine has 80 horses they a very small ones, maybe not even as big as Shetland Ponies. Admittedly mine is an old motor. Serial number in the 200's. It has an unknown history. And to be honest I think half the horses are simply missing in action. I have flown a J160D with a new motor and it is streets ahead of mine.

 

The other problem with it is that it needs to be flown with 1 eye glued to the CHT gauge. Seriously they can start to climb at any time for no apparent reason. As a result of this she simply does not climb very well at all. I have spoken to several other owners and they do not have the same problems, so I may have an issue with my motor or with the installation or both.

 

I bought it at the right price being well aware of the faults and the intention of changing the motor anyway so this is not a real problem for me.

 

The other thing is the wheels/tyres look very fragile to me after the Foxbat especially. The undercarriage looks strong but the wheels and tyres do not look fit for purpose to me anyway.

 

My solution is simple. Replace the motor but that is a topic for another thread if anyone is interested.

 

In summary the Hanuman is a well designed well built aircraft that should suit many first aircraft buyers with plenty of room and carrying capacity. I bought mine with the intention of flying it for 12 months and moving it on. I am already rethinking the moving it on bit. It handles well and I believe it will land in a very short space once I get to know her better. And once she has the new motor I hope she will be able to get out of very short spaces as well.

 

 

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Why trailer around Oz......just buy a jab, and fly around, then fly around again, then just for the hell of it.......fly around again.

 

Me n her ( wife ) get about a lot, jabs everywhere, other brands not that often. Get it well serviced, do a couple of mods......then off you go.

 

 

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It doesn't need to be factory built for the owner to be trained in the aircraft, you do however need an instructor willing to train in your aircraft.

Doesn't CAO 95.55 restrict flight training to the builder of the aircraft (not subsequent owners) ?

 

 

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Doesn't CAO 95.55 restrict flight training to the builder of the aircraft (not subsequent owners) ?

You are right. CAO95.55 allows flight training of the builder or builders of amateur built aircraft. For GA aircraft however REG 262AP allows flight training of the owner of the aircraft. Best to check with the ops manager to verify.

 

 

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