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Can you spot the mistake ?


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1795256241_GAsCOBookleterror.jpg.87ce9a42567d80bfd7785b8f37cf6471.jpg I attended a CAA General Aviation safety presentation recently, with loads of good advice and a really useful discussion aimed at reducing midairs and other less painful incidents in UK airspace. We were given a load of booklets and other publications aimed at Safety. These meetings are held regularly at locations all over the UK and staffed by volunteers consisting of Atc officers, Pilots and engineers, this time we had a Gent from the Brilliant UK Air Accident Investigation Branch. ( Althought this organisation is NOT part of the CAA, and is totally independent oddly enough. . . )

 

The illustration shows one page of the "Cockpit Companion" booklet we were given, which contains an error. Can you spot it ? . . .( PLEASE - Instructors and 53,000 hour ex-airline jockeys, and old F*rts like me, let the kids / newbies have a go at this.)

 

I'll think of a suitable prize if a raw student picks it. ( no cheating please. . . ! ! !

 

)

 

First correct answer, AND what it means, and what it SHOULD BE to [email protected]

 

Phil

 

 

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Or maybe 4dots could b a good name but some would say 3dots would be better. :-).If a raw student made that mistake he should get 6 of the best!

Blimey Jabba,. . . are you an old hand ? . . . . . anyway, if you're a student you're the winner ! Blimey, how long did it take you ? ( be discreet please )

 

 

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I have always thought a good name for a dog would be Spot the Deliberate Mistake.

Can't believe any mistake in a publication dedicated to safety would be in any way deliberate, but the company taskked with the Publishing. . . .are a private firm who specialise in airfield directories, and pilot shop supplies. . . . . . ie, non - operational / governmental. . . .

 

A friend of mine in OZ had a greyhound named "Spot" although he raced under the name of Grey Destroyer" . . . . when he retired it, he took it to the vet's and had it put down the bugger. . . ! mind you, he WAS a Pommie expat. . . . . . (swine)

 

 

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You blokes are just too darn GOOD. . . . .! but I'd like to know how long you looked at it,. . . .and Struth I KNOW you won't tell the truth ! ! ! ! ! it's a macho thing innit LLLLLLOL . . .apart of course,. . .from the fact that you have not read the question properly. . . .?

 

 

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Hi Phil

 

Sadly it took me about the same ten seconds. Took me much longer to come up with the cryptic response so I wouldn't give away the answer to anyone who really wanted to nut it out.

 

I can't claim the prize, I'm not a student, been flying for about twenty years and in my misspent youth was an amateur radio operator, in the days when morse was a required part of the curriculum and plenty of people actually used it for their comms.

 

I did the same too. Had conversations with people completely in morse. It was initially challenging and gradually was just like conversing in another language, you just flipped into morse mode and away you went.

 

At my best I wasn't very good. I could read about 18 words a minute. I used to "talk" with a guy who had been a radio operator on lancasters in WW2 and then with a civilian service in the middle east. He used to get me to send as as fast as I could (which was much faster than reading it) and I reckon I would top out at 40 or so words a minute with a paddle key. (Much slower with a normal key. ) And I could never go too fast for him. He was incredible. (and his wife was also very good - she had been a WAAAF (I think that was the Aust version of the WAAF) radio operator as well)

 

Ah, the good ol'days. ... maybe not

 

 

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I noticed it, thought looked a bit odd, but not being familiar with Sam's work continued on and came up with nothing. Now that you mention it though....

 

rgmwa

 

 

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[ATTACH=full]34428[/ATTACH] I attended a CAA General Aviation safety presentation recently, with loads of good advice and a really useful discussion aimed at reducing midairs and other less painful incidents in UK airspace. We were given a load of booklets and other publications aimed at Safety. These meetings are held regularly at locations all over the UK and staffed by volunteers consisting of Atc officers, Pilots and engineers, this time we had a Gent from the Brilliant UK Air Accident Investigation Branch. ( Althought this organisation is NOT part of the CAA, and is totally independent oddly enough. . . )The illustration shows one page of the "Cockpit Companion" booklet we were given, which contains an error. Can you spot it ? . . .( PLEASE - Instructors and 53,000 hour ex-airline jockeys, and old F*rts like me, let the kids / newbies have a go at this.)

 

I'll think of a suitable prize if a raw student picks it. ( no cheating please. . . ! ! !

 

)

 

First correct answer, AND what it means, and what it SHOULD BE to [email protected]

 

Phil

B in morse code is _... (three dits, not four). Any other mistakes? One second to spot because I use morse being a Ham Radio Nerd. (VK5KKS)

 

 

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I don't know Morse....so that passed me by. But some of the emphasis on syllables was interesting. British emphasis must be different from Australian...not that I've noticed before.

 

HOH-TEL instead of HOH-TEL

 

NO-VEM-BER instead of NO-VEM-BER

 

PAH-PAH instead of PAH-PAH and a couple more.

 

 

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I don't know Morse....so that passed me by. But some of the emphasis on syllables was interesting. British emphasis must be different from Australian...not that I've noticed before.HOH-TEL instead of HOH-TEL

 

NO-VEM-BER instead of NO-VEM-BER

 

PAH-PAH instead of PAH-PAH and a couple more.

Well done (or is that bravo!) you've found three more errors. I didn't look any further after the fourth 'dit'

 

Your version is exactly what I was taught in the UK and appears in numerous other sources. The Cockpit Companion is henceforth demoted to Toilet Companion!

 

 

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B in morse code is _... (three dits, not four). Any other mistakes? One second to spot because I use morse being a Ham Radio Nerd. (VK5KKS)

Yes, I started being a radio nerd at a very early age too ! . . . last callsign as I left OZ was VK4 YC . . . got G4 OHK ( old hairy kangaroo ) now . . . started learning morse in the Air cadets at age 13.5 yrs,. . . and still use it with a few other saddoes (!) on the HF bands. . prrefer a straight key though, don't like paddles sideswipers !

 

I don't know Morse....so that passed me by. But some of the emphasis on syllables was interesting. British emphasis must be different from Australian...not that I've noticed before.HOH-TEL instead of HOH-TEL

 

NO-VEM-BER instead of NO-VEM-BER

 

PAH-PAH instead of PAH-PAH and a couple more.

After flying in Australia for a decade or so, I got used to Ozphonetiks. . .and got picked up on this a few times in the UK for wrong emphasis, I guess the controlers in the early eigthties were a little more pedantic re "Pilotspeak" on radio that they are nowadays. . . . Phil

 

 

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Oh Phil, you have no idea how pedantic the UK are on their radio tests compared to OZ ... took 1 look at the UK requirements and decided to drag out my OZ radio licence and use it instead of going again with the UK one ... CAP413 I am sure was designed to weed out any suicidal flying students by pushing them over the edge before they were let loose with an actual licence!

 

My OZ radio licence was the ONLY one I used in the UK for 12 years ... just added PPl and NPPL to it and I was free to pootle all around the place ... and frankly my OZ emphasis on the phonetic was the least issue - generally my accent was enough to get most pilots giggling when giving my UK regn over the airwaves ;0)

 

 

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Oh Phil, you have no idea how pedantic the UK are on their radio tests compared to OZ ... took 1 look at the UK requirements and decided to drag out my OZ radio licence and use it instead of going again with the UK one ... CAP413 I am sure was designed to weed out any suicidal flying students by pushing them over the edge before they were let loose with an actual licence!My OZ radio licence was the ONLY one I used in the UK for 12 years ... just added PPl and NPPL to it and I was free to pootle all around the place ... and frankly my OZ emphasis on the phonetic was the least issue - generally my accent was enough to get most pilots giggling when giving my UK regn over the airwaves ;0)

Don't get me started on CAP413 Kasper. . .! . . .that was so obviously compiled by a junior civil service apprentice within the CAA QANGO whose normal job was collating reguations for the operation of agricultural machinery and toilet management. It is SO poorly constructed that when the Cfi and myself carried out radio courses we first had to re-write a syllabus which students could actually understand; and update the mnemonics to reflect the basics of what was actually required. And we STILL managed a 90 plus percent pass rate in the written / practical exams in which we prepared them, and we ran successive courses for more than ten years.

 

I'm not for one minute suggesting that "Microlight" student pilots were a bit thick, but that the publication was confusing to a lot of people. Basic radio comms for the use of those flying leisure aircraft, generally outside controlled airspace in the open FIR, ought to fall into a simple W - W - W system, ie" Who are you - Where are you - What do you want" in a nutshell. And if pilots wish to proceed further up the greasy pole towards a career in commercial flying, then adapt "Simplecomm" to what is then required.

 

Over the years, I've know guys who were terrified of using a radio in an aircraft. . . . shame really.

 

 

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I just applied for a part 61 licence (trigger event being a BFR) as required. Had to do the English language bit - I stated to the CFI that I hope I don't fail as it is the only language I know.

Good luck with the BFR Frank. . . . .do they allow OzSlang in the test ? ? ? they really ought to in my view . . . one of my radio students was from the Gorbals district of Glasgow, . . .the examiner was a CFI born in deepest darkest Somerset, . . .this was a bit like an Arab trying to understand a Welshman ! ! ! ( Gawd elp the controllers he had to communicate with in later times . . .) " Ahh Cannaie underrrrstand yUU eetherrr Jimmie. . . ."

 

 

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PHIL

 

It was more intended to point out how stupid some of what is coming out of CASA currently. I have been doing either a BFR or instrument renewal since they invented it (I don't remember BFRs 35 yrs ago?) but if you want to fly one has to put up with whatever crap they keep coming up with.

 

In case you are not across it, with the new CASRs everyone with an existing licence has to apply for a new Lic within a 3yr period at the occurrence of a "trigger event".

 

 

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