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Air bike coming from Seattle.


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0BB2AB98-8009-4D42-986E-7A85795DFE21.thumb.jpeg.7e0bf04f25c6a7dc160bc60ddf2a4866.jpegI purchased this. My new buddy Pat is already putting the quicksilver in container. Can’t think of anything else that’ll fit in with a plane nicely other than another plane.

 

Anyone own one of these? I did a search and noticed somebody managed to crash one...

 

This is I’m told the best if the airbikes in USA. It didn’t sell at auction and Pat and I reached agreement at 10k. Not something I planned on. We will see. Will need tail dragged endorsement as well as finish LSA conversion when I eventually get back to Australia. End October booked and hope I can return and quarantine on French island.

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I have always wondered why Airbikes don't have a bottom cowl half? I think it would look better with one. Is it to do with cooling airflow or is it just the rugged look?

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I have always wondered why Airbikes don't have a bottom cowl half? I think it would look better with one. Is it to do with cooling airflow or is it just the rugged look?

I’ve reviewed YouTube videos on these aircraft. The designer was all about minimalism. KISS principle. I design product and I was watching video with one of the original guys talking about how hard it is to do simple. It’s way harder to design for simplicity. I’ve made a living trying always to blend simplicity with functionality. Most engineers I’ve worked with just keep adding bits. So, yeah, I think it’s the simplicity deal.

 

I was also talking with the owner today. He said that for the USA they have to keep ultralights under 65 knots. So, that’s also saying a bit less streamlining is a good thing.

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I’ve reviewed YouTube videos on these aircraft. The designer was all about minimalism. KISS principle. I design product and I was watching video with one of the original guys talking about how hard it is to do simple. It’s way harder to design for simplicity. I’ve made a living trying always to blend simplicity with functionality. Most engineers I’ve worked with just keep adding bits. So, yeah, I think it’s the simplicity deal.

I'm a simplicity with functionality adherent too, Mike. I worked on degrees of automation in various high maintenance industrial settings, and we maintained a belief in the strong correlation between simplicity and reliability.

Maintenance staff at one of our plants even invented a name for it: "Tractor Logic", alluding to the old Fordson or Massey Ferguson tractors that you just turned on at start of day, and they kept going and going and going......)

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I’ve reviewed YouTube videos on these aircraft. The designer was all about minimalism. KISS principle. I design product and I was watching video with one of the original guys talking about how hard it is to do simple. It’s way harder to design for simplicity. I’ve made a living trying always to blend simplicity with functionality. Most engineers I’ve worked with just keep adding bits. So, yeah, I think it’s the simplicity deal.

 

I was also talking with the owner today. He said that for the USA they have to keep ultralights under 65 knots. So, that’s also saying a bit less streamlining is a good thing.

Fair comment but then why have a spinner and spats of the main wheels. Neither are necessary & are there for looks and streamlining.

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Fair comment but then why have a spinner and spats of the main wheels. Neither are necessary & are there for looks and streamlining.

I’ll ask Pat :) Pat has 2 lake houses “as you do” and flew the quicksilver with floats between them. Cool guy. Same height as me and 60lb heavier so,the aircraft will work with my lanky frame.

 

I think,the answer is that they wanted to push the limits a bit. Still, this aircraft gets along at a fairly leisurely 55 knots. The quicksilver has almost 90hp. I was flying the, in Phillipines with 50hp. That’s going to be interesting. Still, I think around 50 knots. It’s all about open air and no rush.

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I'm a simplicity with functionality adherent too, Mike. I worked on degrees of automation in various high maintenance industrial settings, and we maintained a belief in the strong correlation between simplicity and reliability.

Maintenance staff at one of our plants even invented a name for it: "Tractor Logic", alluding to the old Fordson or Massey Ferguson tractors that you just turned on at start of day, and they kept going and going and going......)

You’re my guy then :) I’m daily in our record plant tinkering with automated plant.

Grew up on a farm with the little grey fergie. Can’t remember how many times nearly killed by it. Favourite method was the tie something to rear 3 point linkage and be surprised when tractor started to turn over. Makes sense of course. If the wheel can’t turn the tractor does!

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I once had to free the body of a bloke off the gearstick of a Fergie which had rotated around its rear wheels as he was trying to pull and old car out of scrub.

 

Long, long ago there was a farm safety poster whose message was "Hitch high and die".

 

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I once had to free the body of a bloke off the gearstick of a Fergie which had rotated around its rear wheels as he was trying to pull and old car out of scrub.

 

Long, long ago there was a farm safety poster whose message was "Hitch high and die".

 

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I managed this once at 15 years old. Remember jumping on the clutch at a fair angle. 3 point linkage was in the up position. I could even take you to the spot it happened. Clyde north Victoria. It’ll have houses on it one day soon so I’ll have to show the house it happened at.

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I admire you, but you can fly that by yourself.

I’m not sure. I think it’s just the legs out instead of in as the point of concern. I have same concern. The quicksilver just seems safe because I’ve flown them. Like an armchair that slowly makes its way across the sky. This does look precarious. No copilot either. Solo is really solo from the get go.

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I’ll ask Pat :) Pat has 2 lake houses “as you do” and flew the quicksilver with floats between them. Cool guy. Same height as me and 60lb heavier so,the aircraft will work with my lanky frame.

 

I think,the answer is that they wanted to push the limits a bit. Still, this aircraft gets along at a fairly leisurely 55 knots. The quicksilver has almost 90hp. I was flying the, in Phillipines with 50hp. That’s going to be interesting. Still, I think around 50 knots. It’s all about open air and no rush.

The Quicksilver has been around a long time. The original was weightshift controlled and I flew one that was imported in to NZ in 1978 or thereabouts. It was nice to fly but a bit noisy. I think it had a single cylinder 2 stroke engine & at that time I was a purist flying hang gliders. The airbike just looks like fun. I like the idea of riding it like a bike with your legs on footpegs outside the fuselage.

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The Quicksilver has been around a long time. The original was weightshift controlled and I flew one that was imported in to NZ in 1978 or thereabouts. It was nice to fly but a bit noisy. I think it had a single cylinder 2 stroke engine & at that time I was a purist flying hang gliders. The airbike just looks like fun. I like the idea of riding it like a bike with your legs on footpegs outside the fuselage.

 

So, we have a test pilot. Excellent.

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It's tailwheel for sure but there's been plenty of these flying and they look basically a good structure, triangulated and good load paths.. Yeah I don't think you need the wheel spats. It makes pumping tyres difficult and mud a no no, as they can fill up with it and the wheel locks if you are unlucky. You'll get a bit of STINK from the exhaust location. till you get a bit of speed up. I'd be happy to fly one, (as long as the wind is not too strong) Nev

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It's tailwheel for sure but there's been plenty of these flying and they look basically a good structure, triangulated and good load paths.. Yeah I don't think you need the wheel spats. It makes pumping tyres difficult and mud a no no, as they can fill up with it and the wheel locks if you are unlucky. You'll get a bit of STINK from the exhaust location. till you get a bit of speed up. I'd be happy to fly one, (as long as the wind is not too strong) Nev

Another test pilot. I just know I’m not flying it until somebody else does. Hadn’t thought of mud or pumping air.

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I'd reckon if you can handle a Thruster, you'd walk one of these in. Do your endorsement in a Drifter. (a bit more forgiving). The wheels are well back on the 'cycle. That helps. Nev

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I reckon if you can make a Jab stick right on the numbers and keep the weight off the nosewheel, you are doing OK.. There would be worse planes to train in. Nev

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A bloke at Childers Qld (where we are based) had an Airbike, the one that crashed. He sold the wreck, so don't know if the new owner got it flying. We followed him in our RANS S7 to a private strip. The Airbike went so slow (and low) that we kept losing him as we orbited, to avoid getting ahead of him. So they are not speed demons.

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I saw an Air-Bike for the first time at Donnington Air Park, back in the early eighties! loved it and I certainly would fly one, given the chance.

 

Franco.

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