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How Often to Fly


scre80
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Hi All,

 

I have just completed my 3rd lesson. Just wondering, when anyone was learning to fly, how often do you try to get out and fly?

 

I am aiming for 1 to 2 times a week.

 

Also, once you have got your RA-Aus certificate, how often do you get out to fly for fun?

 

Cheers

 

 

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Scre80,

 

Doing it like you are 1 to 2 times a week is great, means you won't have to do so much revision on a previous lesson had, will work out cheaper for you.

 

As for how often you fly well that is up to how much disposable income you have to fly with.

 

Me personally I average over 100hrs per year and I work away on rotation for 6 months of a year, so 100hrs in 6 months is a pretty good effort, mind you I own my own plane now which helps.

 

Alf

 

 

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You are on right course, 1 hour once a week is the minimum. If you can afford more you will get your licence quicker.

 

Average is 20-25 hours to get your licence if you are not older than 25 . Add one more hour for each year after 25.

 

And of course dedicated instructor is a must.

 

When you get your licence try to fly every week , it is pretty good target taking into consideration other commitments, money and weather.

 

I clocked up 300 hrs in 20 months but had a few long flights taking time off work.

 

As we say happy landings

 

George

 

 

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Thanks George and Alf,

 

I was thinking it would take me 20 to 30 hours. I am 34 so yes, things take a little longer than a few years ago. Just had my 3rd lession and the basic controls up in the air are starting to come together a bit more.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

 

 

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Welcome to the skies,

 

I'd agree 1 hr a week minimum. Don't push yourself to overload ,if you can afford 2 hrs, do each hour on different days so you can reflect clearer on each lesson.

 

Don't be shy to ask questions.. Each indervidual is different though so it really comes down to you!

 

You found this forum which tells me you have defiantly been bit by the bug... awesome.

 

Read every thing you can .. Good luck

 

So what ya learning in?and where?

 

 

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I am learning in a J-170, flying out of Gawler, just north of Adelaide. Learning through Adelaide Soaring Club. Great place to learn to fly, get to go over the barossa every lesson!! Instructors are fantastic as well.

 

 

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Scre. I did my training out of Parafield and you're right it is some beautiful flying there. I would recommend getting as many hours before May as you can, as you know the weather that way gets a little tricky for VFR and it can mean months on the ground in early training. I've got 6 weeks on the ground twice in my log book from the winter there and we flew 7days a week, that's allot of canceled flights!! Apart from that 1-2 flights should be fine. In a perfect world I would have liked to fly Monday-Wednesday-Friday

 

 

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Agree all, will try to get as much in as possible, but all depends on the $$, boss (AKA Wife) and work. Hard when you work full time and have 3 young kids!!

 

Work has been great as we have some flexi arrangements, so I can do some work at night from home, . so I am able to get off early 1 day a week.

 

 

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Fly as close to everyday as you can.

 

Last year when I did my RPL, my first 20 hours were spread over nearly 5 months. Weather, availability and the like slowed it down. My next 20 hours were over 5 weeks.

 

You really notice the difference. You forget less. You can really hone those landing skills and when it came to my RPL flying test, I'd flown 4 times that week already, including a full dry run test. Needless to say I passed.

 

I should add I was fortunate enough to be able to do those final 20 hours while on holidays from work, and I don't have small kids either.

 

 

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All of the above. But, after you reach PC, RPL, PPL or even CPL - only fly after you have decided on practising a specific manoeuvre. Then - just do it until you're happy with the execution.

 

On another track - fly with discipline when you're out there. Hold a heading, or fly a track. Hold altitude precisely. Descents exactly 500 fpm. Climbs at an attitude which gives you the desired IAS. Set your power precisely, and lean accurately. When you are taxying - keep the centreline exactly under your seat. Never miss an opportunity to sharpen your skills.

 

It's not what you do when with an instructor that really counts - it's how you perform without supervision which will mark your standing as a pilot and airman.

 

happy days,

 

 

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ALL good advice. Do a debrief of how you managed the flight's afterwards. Don't have yourself on because that gets you nowhere. Be brutally honest with yourself. Was there any aspect of the flight you were unsure of the correct technique? Make a note of it and do some dual or bone up on the theory from a reliable source.If you are doing any exercises clear the traffic before doing it and pick your spot to perform the manoeuvers carefully. A level figure 8 using 45 degrees of bank is a good exercise. Power on and off and try to keep balanced (ball in centre) at all times. Nev

 

 

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I find once (two shorter sessions in one day) a weekend works well if you have a 9-5 job. I found that once every two weeks is a little bit to far apart.

 

When you start doing circuits it would be great to fly more often as its a consolidation phase of previous skills and the more comfotable you get in the circuit the quicker you will go solo.

 

One thing I found that was helpful is to take the poh checklists (or checklists provided by your club/instructor), copy into a word doc and add in little personal tips for each stage of flight (incl radio calls) that are not normally contained in the poh (particularly good for circuits). Then review this personal checklist before each flight so that its fresh in your mind (some call it Chair flying).

 

Best of luck.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Best advice ?. . .

 

Listen to what your instructor tells you and don't get diverted by comments from "Other Pilots" until you have enough experience under you belt to benefit from external influences. . . .everyone on this and various other forums will be happy to give you friendly advice, based upon years of experience. . .but the watchwords must be. . . Listen to your instructor. . . . . you'll have plenty of time after you've qualified, to take advice on quite a number of related aspects. . .

 

Good fortune and may the winds be favourable. . .! ! !

 

 

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All of the above. But, after you reach PC, RPL, PPL or even CPL - only fly after you have decided on practising a specific manoeuvre. Then - just do it until you're happy with the execution.On another track - fly with discipline when you're out there. Hold a heading, or fly a track. Hold altitude precisely. Descents exactly 500 fpm. Climbs at an attitude which gives you the desired IAS. Set your power precisely, and lean accurately. When you are taxying - keep the centreline exactly under your seat. Never miss an opportunity to sharpen your skills.

 

It's not what you do when with an instructor that really counts - it's how you perform without supervision which will mark your standing as a pilot and airman.

 

happy days,

Very good advice there . . . . . .but I have always pondered the imponderable ponder,. . . . . .WHY IS IT . . . that when you do something REALLY GOOD, with your flying appliance,. . . . Neat, exceptionally tidy, accurate, careful, a joy to watch. . . . . . .is there NOBODY EVER there to witness it ? ? ?

 

And yet when you really Stuff it up, . . . . . . the world and his wife, all your flying club friends, plus great granny and all the grandkids just happen to be watching . . . . . .

 

This thought occurred to me the other morning, as I was walking into the Darwin Foundation offices, and got smacked in the nose by an evolving door. . . . . .

 

>

 

 

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I don't know why I suddenly thought of this,. . .drifting slightly I know (!) I was fortunate enough to attend a special event some years ago whilst working in the London area. The event was a formal dinner and presentation of an achievement award for Brian Trubshaw, one of the Concord project senior test pilots.

 

One of his ex - first officers regaled the tale of a Concord landing in New York, . . at which time the controllers and certain US carrier company pilots were having a "How close to the centreline can you land" competition . . .( well, it was America after all . . . and they needed something to help with the boredom. . .? ) the game was that the tower guys would report how far right or left of "Center" on the runways the aircraft had landed. ( How they would Know that without a "runwaycenterlinecam" I don't know. . .

 

The Concord crew duly landed, and on the rollout, the tower reported "Speedbird Concord 132, you were slightly Left of center. ."

 

Allegedly,. . Trubshaw immediately responded with . . Yeees,. . . thank you,. . .and my first officer was slightly to the right of it. .!! " Lovely put down thought I. . . . . and it raised quite a big giggle amongst the dinner guests. . . . . ( well, those that understood it anyhow ! )

 

 

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With long fuselages the cockpit is a long way forward of the mainwheels, which is where it counts. The nosewheel may not touchdown for another 600 metres. Concorde approaches at a high fuselage angle with the cockpit section angled down. Nev

 

 

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All of the above. But, after you reach PC, RPL, PPL or even CPL - only fly after you have decided on practising a specific manoeuvre. Then - just do it until you're happy with the execution.On another track - fly with discipline when you're out there. Hold a heading, or fly a track. Hold altitude precisely. Descents exactly 500 fpm. Climbs at an attitude which gives you the desired IAS. Set your power precisely, and lean accurately. When you are taxying - keep the centreline exactly under your seat. Never miss an opportunity to sharpen your skills.

 

It's not what you do when with an instructor that really counts - it's how you perform without supervision which will mark your standing as a pilot and airman.

 

happy days,

I just wanted say that really hit the nail on the head for me! really helpful thank you.

 

 

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I was walking into the Darwin Foundation offices, and got smacked in the nose by an evolving door. . . . . .>

Those evolving doors can be a bitch.

 

 

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