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Seventy plus years of being an aeroplane nut helps! Memory goes back to seeing the Bristol Brabazon fly over Edinburgh. Add to that a bookshelf full of reference books and you have your answer!

And for those of us not into 70 years of being a nut ... 40 years + reference library + a job years while at Uni watching hundreds of hours of film and building an index to the archive - getting paid

Yes, Googles algorithms find virtually everything that has ever been posted for public display. And I've spent 20 yrs fine-tuning my internet searching abilities.   As a little thread drift

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Either nobody knows the turboprop/turbofan, or only Kasper is prepared to have a shot. The answer is the Gulfsream America Hustler.Details here.

 

1110781524_GulfstreamAmericanHustler.thumb.jpg.ab7ffd5d12742ac55763930cda7a6c40.jpg

Edited by red750
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Student Pilot - Correct on the ladies ID, her often mis-spelt name is Jacqueline "Jackie" Cochran, famous businesswoman and aviatrix of renown. The first woman to break the sound barrier in an aircraft.

As regards the aircraft ID - sorry, not even remotely correct, try again.

 

Old K - Not really a friend of Howard Hughes - but he did lease the aircraft from her after much badgering, with an option to purchase. Not one of Howard Hughes toys, but he greatly desired the aircraft.

 

Kasper - Sorry, not correct on the aircraft ID. Do you really suffer from misogyny that much, that you'd completely dismiss a famous aviatrix as unworthy of even being identified? :no no no:

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Mothguy is correct. This particular Northrop Gamma 2G of Cochran's went through three major engine alterations.

 

Initially fitted with a Curtiss Conqueror V12 (V-1750), this engine proved troublesome, and constantly overheated, and had supercharger problems.

 

The Curtiss was replaced with a 14 cylinder P&W Twin Wasp during Cochran's ownership. I personally believe the original engine made for superb aircraft lines, but it was not a successful engine.

 

During Howard Hughes lease period, he re-engined the aircraft with a 9 cylinder Wright Cyclone (SGR-1820-G5), specifically to win the long-distance speed race from L.A. to N.Y.

 

Cochran did not sell the Gamma 2G to Hughes and she recovered it from him at the end of his lease period - and the Wright Cyclone was removed and the Twin Wasp was again re-installed, in April 1936.

 

Oddly, the Wright Cyclone installed by Hughes was not certified, due to its newness, and the Gamma with this engine was never approved for flight by the U.S. Dept of Commerce.

 

Sadly, the aircraft was damaged beyond repair in a landing accident in July 1936, and was written off.

 

https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/northrop-gamma-2g/

Edited by onetrack
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Student Pilot - Correct on the ladies ID, her often mis-spelt name is Jacqueline "Jackie" Cochran, famous businesswoman and aviatrix of renown. The first woman to break the sound barrier in an aircraft.

As regards the aircraft ID - sorry, not even remotely correct, try again.

 

Old K - Not really a friend of Howard Hughes - but he did lease the aircraft from her after much badgering, with an option to purchase. Not one of Howard Hughes toys, but he greatly desired the aircraft.

 

Kasper - Sorry, not correct on the aircraft ID. Do you really suffer from misogyny that much, that you'd completely dismiss a famous aviatrix as unworthy of even being identified? :no no no:

It’s not misogyny- the thread is identify the aircraft not the pilot.

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  • 4 weeks later...

SIAI-Marchetti SV-20 Project

By the end of 1972, about 200,000 manhours had been spent on the SV-20 design, including wind tunnel testing at the Universities of Turin, Milan, and Pisa, but a prototype was not completed

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This topic gives me impetus to get out and research different aircraft.. and along the way find other variants and types.

I Thank you 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I used to help service one back around 1965 in Edinburgh. Quite a luxurious machine although typical early Beagle, probably heavy for what was  the British equivalent of a C172. Had an interesting, supposedly thrust augmenter exhaust system.

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Do you ever wonder if Beagle failed because they were all dogs, literally, Terrier, Airedale, Pup and Bulldog? I don’t remember if the twins had names, only remember their numbers!

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