Jump to content

Did you know there was a three engined 747?


Recommended Posts

WOW that's ugly/strange ?   it's amazing how you become so used to a particular shape that when you see a change it looks so bizarre. It is obviously a short fuselage version as well

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The efficiency of the centre engine is reduced with that configuration due to the S duct. There are short versions of the "Normal" engines set up also. At one time the twin engined jets had restrictive alternate requirements as you are required to land at the nearest suitable aerodrome if only on one engine. Nev

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard that the flying telescope, SOFIA, has recently been taken out of service due to the high cost of running it. It was due to continue for another few years but they retired it early. 

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bit exaggerated- the airframe never existed.  The pics are all cobbled together artists impressions. 
 

There never was an airframe from the 747 family with 3 engines

 

however there were several 5 engines 747’s …. All were 747s flying on 4 with a spare engine literally slung under the wing or slapped on the side of the fuselage to allow transport of a spare engine to a stranded aircraft that needed a swap out and that was the quick way to get it there.  

  • Agree 2
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, kasper said:

A bit exaggerated- the airframe never existed.  The pics are all cobbled together artists impressions. 

Kudos to you kasper, you are right. Sorry everyone, I took the article at face value.

 

A bit of a search located the original photo of the Pan Am 747SP which was used as the basis if the photoshop image. I don't know about the other one. Quite possibly, the concept may have been investigated and dismissed. Here is the original photo, Compare the two - background, aero tug, marshaller, etc. A very convincing ruse.

 

336615193_747SPPanAm.thumb.jpg.707ee5807247d10bc5b03ae18d4a186e.jpg

  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite a while ago (>10 years) ATC at Sydney noticed a 747 taking off with only 3 engines working. They queried the pilots who responded that that engine hadnt been working for a month.  It was, I think, a Chech republic company that we’re doing a once a week flight to Sydney.... very lightly loaded.  Their approval was subsequently pulled.  My source was a senior engineer with Airservices.   So there was a de-facto 3 engined 747.

  • Like 1
  • Informative 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the unique features of the 747 was its fifth pod. This ‘spare’ engine mount gave it the ability to lug along an extra engine, something it was capable of doing even on a revenue flight. Of course, the efficiency of the flight would take a hit, but reportedly there were no issues with handling as a result.

 

Back in 2016, this spare pod was put to good use by Australian flag carrier Qantas. It needed to get a replacement engine to Johannesburg in South Africa fast, and by far the quickest and easiest way to do this was by using the fifth pod on a 747 that was headed that way anyhow.

 

Qantas also carried a spare engine on a 707.

 

Qantas-707-fifth-pod-1000x418.thumb.webp.5c3fdabd3a3f0b00640044956c528eee.webp

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 19/10/2022 at 2:09 PM, red750 said:

Kudos to you kasper, you are right. Sorry everyone, I took the article at face value.

 

A bit of a search located the original photo of the Pan Am 747SP which was used as the basis if the photoshop image. I don't know about the other one. Quite possibly, the concept may have been investigated and dismissed. Here is the original photo, Compare the two - background, aero tug, marshaller, etc. A very convincing ruse.

 

336615193_747SPPanAm.thumb.jpg.707ee5807247d10bc5b03ae18d4a186e.jpg

 

 

We all get deceived sometimes, mine was when I married a petite young girl with a really pretty smile.   

 

The only time I see her teeth now is when she is trying to bite me !

 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Helpful 1
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was an Alitalia flight where they'd forgotten to start the last  engine on a DC-10. I think it was delayed till the tug was disconnected and then they must have been in a hurry.  That plane had a Flight engineer as well..Must have had a good wine with the lunch.  Nev

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So if a 747 can carry a spare engine sound underneath (Making off field engine replacement possible?), do you reckon I could sling a spare Jabiru 3300 underneath the J200 for when....?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The engine is generally transported for a different plane at some base on route.  Jet engines are easily put out of balance if carried other than on an end or able to turn.. Nev

  • Like 1
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ohh, I thought they were just carrying a spare as one or more of the others were a little dodgy ‘on condition’. & isn’t that why they take an engineer ... to do the mechanicing en-route?  On my yacht I carry a spare short engine and gearbox... but invariably it’s usually a small ancillary like a CDI ignition charger coil or trigger, or the friggen oil pressure sensor that fails.

 

 Stuart, the back of the J200 is for the galley and hammock?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...