Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Looks interwar - more streamlined than WWI. Is it just me or does the observer look caucasian? Closest aircraft that I could find with the right sort of specs was the Breguet 14, but it has a distinctive flat cowling with cooling slats, while this one look more radial or rotary.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotary's disappeared at the end of WW1. They were very thirsty on fuel and were good at getting you up to height quickly. When the war stopped they faded out.Their "windage" while it kept the engine cooler was a loss of energy and efficiency..

 

That plane appears to have a "normal" single row radial engine, and layout of about early thirties vintage. Machine gun synchronised with prop might date it a bit. Nev

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotary's disappeared at the end of WW1. They were very thirsty on fuel and were good at getting you up to height quickly. When the war stopped they faded out.Their "windage" while it kept the engine cooler was a loss of energy and efficiency..That plane appears to have a "normal" single row radial engine, and layout of about early thirties vintage. Machine gun synchronised with prop might date it a bit. Nev

Wasn't there a Chinese v Japanese war sometime after ww1 ?

 

 

  • Winner 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn't there a Chinese v Japanese war sometime after ww1 ?

You may be onto something there, at the bottom of the WIKI link it says that the Japanese used them post WWI.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may be onto something there, at the bottom of the WIKI link it says that the Japanese used them post WWI.

The Japanese were our allies in WWI and the British were very active in helping them build up their naval air power during the 20's and 30's. Surely someone can translate the captions for us.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to Wiki - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmson_2

 

"Japan undertook license production as the "Army Type Otsu 1", also known as the Kawasaki-Salmson. The number of aircraft built in Japan is unclear: 300 were built by Kawasaki, and the same quantity by the Imperial Japanese Army's Tokorozawa supply depot, although the total number of aircraft produced may have been as high as 1,000."

 

No mention of China ever using them.

 

It says that they were first delivered in October 1917, and post-war they remained in service until 1924.

 

 

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One reason for Aus to stay right out of their current differences.

Unless you live here you can't imagine the seething hatred that Chinese have for Japanese, it's, sadly, even taught in schools far worse than Israel about Germany.

 

Anyone seen supporting Japan puts themselves at risk and the Islands aren't an issue Australia should go anywhere near.

 

 

  • Agree 2
  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you live here you can't imagine the seething hatred that Chinese have for Japanese

Not hard to imagine, much the same as the hatred of Australians taught in indonesia. Yet in Catholic primary schools, at least, our kids are taught to love Indonesians, it's going to be a sadly one-sided relationship for most of them.

 

 

  • Caution 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...