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Ejector seat for light aircraft


rgmwa
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Why not with rocket technology, plus command ejection for the pax. I recall a Jet Provost based in Southend UK that went for flight with pilot and brother in law (or related somehow). They weren't allowed to leave the the bang seats live, but upside down it still slid off the pole quite nicely. Fortunately the seat parachute auto deployment still worked!

 

 

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Possibly a lot of aircraft structures would not take the extra load on top of what might already be happening. You wear a parachute during aero's or testing or in airforce jets where you are required to eject. Can't see much applicability to what we do. Put the extra weight into the wing spar and other structural parts. Nev

 

 

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Major,

 

Cypres AAD have a version suited for this sort of deployment. As soon as the ejection sequence starts the AAD is activated and the senses sample the air pressure and the countdown begins for the deployment.

 

Looks like a fun ride, some competition for the BRS system.

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

I've packed a few and sat on a couple in flight .....but didn't need to use one. I did ride the seat training tower at Point Cook which was about a half normal charge boot in the rear. You certainly know you are strapped to one, with one ear cocked for that serious of all commands......Eject, Eject, Eject !......which you had better heed now otherwise it would get very lonely very quickly !.....does anyone know if the training tower at Point Cook still exists ?..it was all part of a course I did at the Institute of Aviation medicine when training to work om Mirages at Williamtown. Also went through the decompression chamber there for hypoxia training.

 

 

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Why not with rocket technology, plus command ejection for the pax. I recall a Jet Provost based in Southend UK that went for flight with pilot and brother in law (or related somehow). They weren't allowed to leave the the bang seats live, but upside down it still slid off the pole quite nicely. Fortunately the seat parachute auto deployment still worked!

Yes it did,. . . . . that was the guy who owns the Transair Pilot Shop chain,. . . . .his Brother's seat fell out through the canopy whilst the aircraft was inverted. It then performed correctly, and separated from the passenger, allowing him to descend safely by parachute. . .. The seat continued to Earth ending up through the roof of a house narrowly missing the elderly couple who were having a quiet cup of tea whilst watching the telly. . . . .

 

The owner landed the JP thinking his passenger and relative had become violently and painfully deceased. . . .he was quite happy when he discovered that this was not the case ! ! !

 

Phil

 

 

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Looks like a Sportstar.

Yes it did a bit didn't it Dazz,. . . . . . I wonder if they did it with the canopy removed prior. . . . . or perhaps operation of the Rapid departure system requires canopy ejection a couple of Nano seconds before the seat, as with some military types, as being strained at high velocity thru shattering polycarbonate would mess up the average suit and tie. . . ( It certainly Killed "Goose" in Top Gun. . . when the explosive bolts were late in going off . . . ) wasn't there a thread some time ago regarding Sportstar canopies causing aerodynamic problems when they came open in flight, ? ? ?

 

I'm sure I remember something about that, . . .maybe the canopy only causes problems if there is one fitted. . . . although I was once told when I arrived at my ferrying destination in Scotland in a C-182 after having a huge hailstone penetrate the right side of the windscreen that it was a good job I didn't lose the whole screen as the type has aerodynamic issues and doesn't fly normally sans screen. . . .I never followed this up to see if there was any aerodynamic reason why this would be. . . . . .

 

Anyhow, I PERSONALLY,. . .would prefer the BRS route, as once you have exited your flying appliance, it would then become a free - flight missile, able to crash into theat school house or freeway, rather than the nice slow parachute descent idea, which looks far more civilised. I don't wish to decry anybody's inventions or adaptions if they increase the chance of crew survival in a dire emergency ( not many undire emergencies I guess. . .) perhaps we could discuss this further with the able assistance of some of the more experienced and technical worthies who sometimes frequent this place. . . .

 

Anyway. . . sorry for the digression. . . .

 

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I believe this accessory is available for a small additional cost. Seems like a good idea to me.16209088110_a18c03d656_o_d.jpg

I don't think I've ever heard of Kaiser Willi II being called an accessory. Then again, he was married.

 

 

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Having spent many years flying ejection seat a/c, both the old nasty cartridge seats that guaranteed back injuries to the more sedate rocket seats fitted to the Hornet I am a huge fan of the bang seat, however, fitted to a recreational a/c no, most of our members are mature (me too) & the thought of my wife & I ejecting after a major emergency would probably be worse than staying with the a/c, you are going to hit the ground/obstacles with a thud, if you look at the BRS web site the stats mention it can be used as low as 300ft & you remain in the safe confines of your a/c just like the F111 escape module, a much better survival option.

 

080_plane.gif.36548049f8f1bc4c332462aa4f981ffb.gif

 

 

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Having spent many years flying ejection seat a/c, both the old nasty cartridge seats that guaranteed back injuries to the more sedate rocket seats fitted to the Hornet I am a huge fan of the bang seat, however, fitted to a recreational a/c no, most of our members are mature (me too) & the thought of my wife & I ejecting after a major emergency would probably be worse than staying with the a/c, you are going to hit the ground/obstacles with a thud, if you look at the BRS web site the stats mention it can be used as low as 300ft & you remain in the safe confines of your a/c just like the F111 escape module, a much better survival option. 080_plane.gif.36548049f8f1bc4c332462aa4f981ffb.gif

Plus I can't see the CAA letting recreational fliers desert their aircraft at the first sign of trouble and leaving a few hundred kilo's of metal to return to earth in an uncontrolled manner.

 

From memory even ex-military jets like that old Mig-15 in Archerfield (is that still there?) had to have their ejection seats disabled for this very reason.

 

 

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You're right, one crashed in Canberra in the late 80's/early 90's killing the former Navy A4 pilot & pax when the control rods burnt through after a tail pipe fire, an ejection seat would of saved their lives.

 

From memory even ex-military jets like that old Mig-15 in Archerfield (is that still there?) had to have their ejection seats disabled for this very reason.

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