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Anyone want to try this type of landing


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They have prangs. Lots of them.   They're sportsmen. And they never stop learning. Sure, they're crazy; just like anyone who goes up in one of those ultralight thingies.

Used to watch the Porter in action in Vietnam, their slow-flying ability was highly impressive to see. They used them to drop SAS troops into strips that were basically just small open patches in the

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If only I had the confidence, skill, recency.... Not one to do on you r first flight after lockdown..

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He shifted a pretty large rock on one landing there.. Planes and bulldozers are built differently. IF you fly a plane almost everyday it makes you confident you can land it on a dime so to speak. SIZE matters. I suspect with an A 380 you still need a large aerodrome. Nev

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Great fun and dangerous. Not for the novice pilot. He must be well aware of how the wind is blowing to be able to allow for it when he must be flying by reference to the ground.

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Pretty classic gung-ho American aviator style of flying. I wonder where the, "hold my beer guys, and watch this!" part of the video went to? I wonder what his record of writing off aircraft is?

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What do you do next for thrills comes to mind. Sorry I find it a bit boring and pointless. If you are flying near rocks and tree branches it's a  when not IF situation.  There are plenty of ways to test and refine your flying skills   Endless circuits is NOT one.  unless you vary them a lot .Nev

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I don't see any "hold my beer" type attitude in what we see here.  That trope evokes drunken idiots who are all ego and no skill.

 

I reckon if all pilots were required to attain that level of skill before they get a licence, then aviating, in general, would be a far safer proposition.

 

To me, this guy's in less danger of his engine failing in those valleys than we weekend-warriors are during any of our conventional departures.

 

(Precisely because we're clueless about low level manoeuvering.)

 

It is often said, here, that a lack of low-level training is a real problem in recreational flying. I'd agree, but maybe it's discouraged due to misplaced prejudice; its association with hooning.  Sure, there have been heaps of 'hold my beer' low level tragedies but that has nothing to do with what we see in this video.  Quite the opposite.  I'd be very surprised if this pilot ever spins in on base-to-final at a regular airport.

 

Edited by Garfly
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Flying over densely developed areas in a single (piston) is not my idea of fun either especially if the thing glides at about 100 Knots To gamble you have to able to afford to lose. I've done plenty of fairly silly things (to get there rather than show off to a crowd) The RAAus 45 knot stall  is  a critical  targeted factor. Into any kind of wind to lower your ground speed you should be able to survive the landing. Planes with high threshold speeds and small wheels need long sealed runways and an out landing is a real risk. That's why twins became fairly popular  at one stage, but if you don't fly THEM properly you also die and they are costly and carry less for their weight. 

 I think that blokes risk is with prop damage from a rock or tree branch or a bird strike. You are remote if you're injured. Bears and wolves. Nev

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True.  And the tag line of the end-logo "Think ahead of the aircraft" indicates that he ain't no aerial redneck.

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Well no one I know has ever advocated  that being behind it  was a good idea.  Plenty are, at times..  Especially new on a fast type. It's not just the speed. You have to be organised.. If you aren't a high workload will be your undoing.

      . That's not a workload thing. It's just a "not much room for error" thing . IF you fly a lot, the plane is almost an extension of you  To counter that "Familiarity breeds contempt" AND humans, being always on the lookout for effort reducing, corners may get cut..   Nev

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Anyway, YouTube has figured out that I'm into this stuff (from the safety and comfort of my armchair) so I'm now enjoying the latest of Bushwhacker's adventures.  😉

 

 

Edited by Garfly
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The good thing is he's not going very fast.. Your options are to use aileron and brake but its likely it will pivot severely or go over.  Overshooting is a possibility so you can set it up better closer to help and with a more favourable x wind and headwind. Nev

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15 minutes ago, skippydiesel said:

Soooo! what happens when a tyre blows out on touchdown???????

They have prangs. Lots of them.

 

They're sportsmen. And they never stop learning.

Sure, they're crazy; just like anyone who goes up in one of those ultralight thingies.

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Actually, the poor guy did wreck his lovely Pacer after this, but that was from a more 'conventional' forced landing scenario.

 

 

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Yeah, Nev, you'd think so ... but this is where old Bent Prop introduces his mate's Pacer:

 

 

Edited by Garfly
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Our old mate Student Pilot once rebuilt a Tri-Pacer as a beautiful Pacer.

Y%oFVYTaQ2SGxj7Vi3%0yQ_thumb_9079.jpg

Edited by Garfly
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