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debra stewart

hi, I'm Debbie.

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I am a proud Skyfox Gazelle owner and have been flying for nearly 3 years. I am finding it hard to navigate this site so I may be slow and make mistakes. Apart from that I am eager to meet likeminded gazelle enthusiast's.

 

I hope I am doing this all OK.

 

That's about it for a start.

 

 

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G- Day ! A Fly-Girl, very few around, great to hear ! Look forward to your input !

 

 

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Nice story Debbie, welcome.

 

http://www.examiner.com.au/story/1630464/gazelle-a-sight-for-sore-eyes/

 

LAUNCESTON woman Debbie Stewart was speechless as she watched her new, bright yellow baby drop out of a clear, blue sky yesterday to land safely at the Cranbourne Airfield.

 

``I felt sick, just sick _ I've waited years to get it, it's a month since the day I bought it and it's taken a week for Robert (Sharman) to bring it home,'' Ms Stewart said.

 

``I haven't slept for days, I'm so excited.''

 

The arrival of the Australian-made, two seater Skyfox Gazelle, weighing in at 520 kilograms, was the culmination of a long journey for Ms Stewart.

 

She started flying lessons about eight years ago but gave up after her instructor was killed in a tragic accident.

 

``This year, though, I realised that I still very much wanted to learn to fly and wanted my own plane to do it,'' she said.

 

That's where her new instructor, Tasmanian Aero Club chief flying instructor Robert Sharman, became part of the story.

 

Ms Stewart had searched Australia-wide for a suitable plane in her price range and found it in Western Australia.

 

``It was found in an old farm shed and done up by Peter Boley who lives at Karridale, near Margaret River,'' she said.

 

She couldn't fly the plane to its new home.

 

``I'm still learning,'' she said.

 

So Mr Sharman did _ all the way down the West Australian coast, across the Nullabor to Murray Bridge in South Australia, to Apollo Bay in Victoria and across Bass Strait to Northern Tasmania.

 

Flying about six hours a day, covering about 900 kilometres a day, the journey took him five days.

 

It was a tight fit for the pilot with no room for the new owner.

 

After Mr Sharman loaded his flying gear, fuel and overnight bag, there was just enough room for him to fold his long legs into the pilot's seat.

 

``The weather was perfect, it was an easy trip and I had a tail wind across Bass Strait home,'' Mr Sharman said.

 

He saw a pod of about 50 whales at the head of the Great Australian Bight and taxied into the closest road house and up to the petrol bowser to refuel across the Nullabor.

 

Ms Stewart hopes to be in the air as the pilot of her new plane by Christmas.

 

She is nearly 60 and believes that she is one of the oldest Tasmanian women learning to fly.

 

She plans to be one of the oldest to soon hold a pilot's licence.

 

debbie.jpg.8300a969295dd33ad8d90af024d593c7.jpg

 

 

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What a good story. Get in there Debb. Study, practice and live your dream. We are the lucky ones, those who get to live our dreams.

 

 

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Hello Deb

 

Lovely story about your new aeroplane and its delivery to Tassie.

 

And congrats on getting back into the flying lessons. Keep it up and you'll never regret it.

 

Blue skies!

 

Kaz

 

 

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G- Day ! A Fly-Girl, very few around, great to hear ! Look forward to your input !

thanks for the welcome. While I'm here I am after rear wheel spats for my gazelle, Cheap.

 

That story above is now 3 years old. I am well and truly flying now and loving it.

 

 

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Nice story Debbie, welcome.

The story below is now 3 years old. I am well and truly flying now and enjoying it. I feel like a real pilot now and am well on my way to who knows where !!!!!

 

The Gazelle is still flying beautifully with no problems.

 

Hi ti everyone , Debb

 

http://www.examiner.com.au/story/1630464/gazelle-a-sight-for-sore-eyes/

 

LAUNCESTON woman Debbie Stewart was speechless as she watched her new, bright yellow baby drop out of a clear, blue sky yesterday to land safely at the Cranbourne Airfield.

 

``I felt sick, just sick _ I've waited years to get it, it's a month since the day I bought it and it's taken a week for Robert (Sharman) to bring it home,'' Ms Stewart said.

 

``I haven't slept for days, I'm so excited.''

 

The arrival of the Australian-made, two seater Skyfox Gazelle, weighing in at 520 kilograms, was the culmination of a long journey for Ms Stewart.

 

She started flying lessons about eight years ago but gave up after her instructor was killed in a tragic accident.

 

``This year, though, I realised that I still very much wanted to learn to fly and wanted my own plane to do it,'' she said.

 

That's where her new instructor, Tasmanian Aero Club chief flying instructor Robert Sharman, became part of the story.

 

Ms Stewart had searched Australia-wide for a suitable plane in her price range and found it in Western Australia.

 

``It was found in an old farm shed and done up by Peter Boley who lives at Karridale, near Margaret River,'' she said.

 

She couldn't fly the plane to its new home.

 

``I'm still learning,'' she said.

 

So Mr Sharman did _ all the way down the West Australian coast, across the Nullabor to Murray Bridge in South Australia, to Apollo Bay in Victoria and across Bass Strait to Northern Tasmania.

 

Flying about six hours a day, covering about 900 kilometres a day, the journey took him five days.

 

It was a tight fit for the pilot with no room for the new owner.

 

After Mr Sharman loaded his flying gear, fuel and overnight bag, there was just enough room for him to fold his long legs into the pilot's seat.

 

``The weather was perfect, it was an easy trip and I had a tail wind across Bass Strait home,'' Mr Sharman said.

 

He saw a pod of about 50 whales at the head of the Great Australian Bight and taxied into the closest road house and up to the petrol bowser to refuel across the Nullabor.

 

Ms Stewart hopes to be in the air as the pilot of her new plane by Christmas.

 

She is nearly 60 and believes that she is one of the oldest Tasmanian women learning to fly.

 

She plans to be one of the oldest to soon hold a pilot's licence.

 

[ATTACH=full]39470[/ATTACH]

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Hi Debbie,

 

Great to see a lady flying in Tassie, I flew a yellow gazelle back in the 90's great machine.

 

Rob is a top guy.

 

Fly Safe

 

Regards RW

 

 

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Hi Debbie,

 

Great to hear your story! I flew a Gazelle up until very recently, and enjoyed every minute, so I can very much relate to what you are saying. Hope to hear lots more about your flying exploits in Tassie (and anywhere else!).....

 

Best Regards,

 

Neil

 

 

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Hi Debbie,Great to see a lady flying in Tassie, I flew a yellow gazelle back in the 90's great machine.

 

Rob is a top guy.

 

Fly Safe

 

Regards RW

Yeah, when I got it I was a bit dubious but after 3 years of flying it now, I love it to pieces. I have flown a few other aircraft but I just love the Gazelle. It is so hassle free, well balanced and easy, easy, easy. I'm not very brave so I like my little trouble free baby. Nice to meet you anyway, bye debb

 

 

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Hi Debbie,Great to see a lady flying in Tassie, I flew a yellow gazelle back in the 90's great machine.

 

Rob is a top guy.

 

Fly Safe

 

Regards RW

Yes, he is a good guy. Unfortunately he left the aero club about a year ago now so I had to find another instructor to bring me to solo which he has done.

 

I cannot get my license though, until I can get the plane into the hangar on my own. My hangar is in an awful position and I have to turn the plane 180 deg and push backward at the same time to get the plane in ( uphill) and I don't have the strength, so Until I figure something out I am stuck with lessons as I need someone with me. Not that I mind. I love learning and feel a bit more learning never hurt anyone. I'm in no mad rush to take off into the wild blue yonder on my own anyway..Nice to have met you, bye for now, Debb

 

 

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