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Skyfox trailer, plans or pictures?


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Hello,

I understand that the Skyfox was optionally sold with a trailer where the plane was towed propeller first. I have been searching for information about this factory supplied trailer, but could not even find a photo online. Would anyone have photos or the plans? I want to build one.

Thanks a lot

best

Norman

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Why build when I can sell you a converted, to aircraft carrier,  Viscount Supreme Caravan

 

image.thumb.jpeg.fdbb534c826f984468e9daf713796bf7.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.245c1990c1568274c3d73727b9f4c7f2.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.3e8605513370d0e3d6cde9dd1c926cdf.jpegNSW Registered, Electric Brakes on both axles, Internal tie down points down each side.

(The lights and other stuff where from using it as a spray booth )

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I might be interested, where about is the Oaks and how much were you wanting.

 

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, SAJ said:

I might be interested, where about is the Oaks and how much were you wanting.

 

Where is The Oaks - Maaate! Centre of the known Universe😈

 

Okay,  nearest large town is Camden NSW. We are SW of Sydney.

 

No price discussion on open Forum. I suggest you look up "Toy Trailers", Aircraft Trailers , Enclosed Trailers, etc and get a handle on what the market might be demanding.

 

Edited by skippydiesel
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1 hour ago, Neil Denmark said:

That looks like a great solution! And gives you weather proof storage too. If I was not so far away...😃

Hi neil,

 

Not so far and you would have something to camp in on your way back across the Nullabor😈

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10 hours ago, skippydiesel said:

Why build when I can sell you a converted, to aircraft carrier,  Viscount Supreme Caravan

 

image.thumb.jpeg.fdbb534c826f984468e9daf713796bf7.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.245c1990c1568274c3d73727b9f4c7f2.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.3e8605513370d0e3d6cde9dd1c926cdf.jpegNSW Registered, Electric Brakes on both axles, Internal tie down points down each side.

(The lights and other stuff where from using it as a spray booth )

This is a great solution and I would buy it in a heartbeat! However, I am in Austria, Europe, getting ready to pick up the one and only CA25 in Europe, currently in not-airworthy condition, from Switzerland.

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1 hour ago, nwarthmann said:

This is a great solution and I would buy it in a heartbeat! However, I am in Austria, Europe, getting ready to pick up the one and only CA25 in Europe, currently in not-airworthy condition, from Switzerland.

if you just want to transport it home, hire a flatbed trailer or car trailer.  take plenty of foam rubber and some carpet. lots of ratchet straps .

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Thanks! For the one off pick-up I'll borrow a suitable trailer, however, I am after an own trailer for regular use. All (kitfox) trailers that I have encountered so far have the plane on backwards. I think I remember reading in the Skyfox manual that the optional trailer one could have bought together with the aeroplane was built such that the plane was riding propeller forward. That's my preferred option, and I was hoping someone has photos or even plans for this trailer.

On the note of plans: I am also after high-res scans of original plans, parts lists, and maintenance manual for Skyfox CA25. (Not N, I do have the maintenance manual for Gazelle). I am pleasantly surprised how active this skyfox group on this platform is.  So maybe there is people on here willing to assist with sourcing plans and later down the road part numbers and parts? Thanks a lot! 

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1 hour ago, nwarthmann said:

Thanks! For the one off pick-up I'll borrow a suitable trailer, however, I am after an own trailer for regular use. All (kitfox) trailers that I have encountered so far have the plane on backwards. I think I remember reading in the Skyfox manual that the optional trailer one could have bought together with the aeroplane was built such that the plane was riding propeller forward. That's my preferred option, and I was hoping someone has photos or even plans for this trailer.

On the note of plans: I am also after high-res scans of original plans, parts lists, and maintenance manual for Skyfox CA25. (Not N, I do have the maintenance manual for Gazelle). I am pleasantly surprised how active this skyfox group on this platform is.  So maybe there is people on here willing to assist with sourcing plans and later down the road part numbers and parts? Thanks a lot! 

i agree, always tow it the way it flys. unless its covered

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I made one, I'll see if I can put pictures of it tomorrow. I sold it after I sold my Gazelle, new owner didn't want the trailer.

Bernie.

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This is how I transported my Aeropup, from Gympie to Rockhampton, on my car trailer with a foam mattress cut up as required and all tied down, worked a treat.

 

 

IMG_8567.jpeg

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Looks well loaded Jack - The wings look a bit vulnerable but I guess they were designed to fold & be transported. Assume you reduced your tyre pressure way down??

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  • This is how my Skyfox (Ca21) fitted on a trailer, note there is a white support tube from the front end of the leading edge to the strut attachment point to support the wing as if not used it's only supported with the aft hinge pin bolt. (a must have I believe) Also have a lightly sprung trailer so it is not too firm / stiff on the road bumps as only carrying about 300kg or so.

    14614543_onthetrailer.JPG.08283fa376a8e143150ffc54c697fa4c.JPG

 

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Very tidy Blue.  Tyres 25-30 psi will help a lot. When I decide to go low pressure to reduce the jarring, I hand check tyre temperatures for the next 100 km or so. To hot = need more pressure. To cold = could go a bit lower.

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I see the reason to have the aircraft ' tail ' first .

The hitch weight of the trailer has to be a certain weight .

For safety,  the engine close to the trailer wheels would be good .

spacesailor

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Posted (edited)

Blueadventures trailer looks like a handling disaster waiting to happen, to me - due to the poor positioning of the wheels/axles in relation to the trailer frame and length.

Trailers should always be constructed with the axles mounted central to the frame - or even better, 50mm to 100mm behind the centre point of the main frame. This ensures good handling, and a resistance to tail-wagging, especially when loaded.

 

A trailer with axles mounted forward of the centre point of the trailer main frame is a guarantee that tail-wagging will result the instant the trailer is loaded, and hauled at highway speed.

You have to remember that a tyre blowout on a rear tyre (always a likelihood), will result in immediate adverse handling, and initiate a tail-wagging event.

 

I've just had that happen to me with a tandem (1.8M x 3.6M) enclosed trailer that is professionally well built with centrally-located axles. I was loaded to the limit, blew a rear tyre at 100kmh on a downhill run, and I can tell you, it took all my trailer handling skills to keep control of it.

It was extremely fortunate at the point where I blew the tyre, the highway was extra wide and there were 3 lanes with a passing lane going the other way, so oncoming vehicles were well out of harms way. As it was, I was over the centre line trying to keep control of the vicious tail wag while trying to come to a halt with one basically tyre-less rim.

 

Edited by onetrack
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Hi Onetrack,

No special knowledge, just about 50 years or so of observation and a little experince:

 

In the past it would seem most trailers had the axle(s) just trailing the mid point in the chassi.

In more recent times, most trailers have a definite aft location of the axle(s) putting significant weight on the hitch point/back axle of the tow vehicle

Of course there will be exceptions for special purpose  trailers.

 

Older trailers require knowledge/skill to load, so that they are hitch posative/heavy - not everyone seem to understand this. Carefully loaded this configuration makes for very nice towing. Bad loading can easily result in the trailer steering the tug = accident.

 

Newer trailers also need care in loading, however this is to try and reduce load on the hitch - how often do you see the Grey Nomad with the sparkling new Cruiser nose in the air /Pho Off Road Caravan, hitch almost on the deck? While this will affect steering, possibly damage suspension and may be uncomfortable for the occupants, it tends not to be a major safety risk.

 

In some instances, the newer fashion can not be loaded, so as to reduce the hitch weight and have an even/level tug configuration - in this instance load transfer systems can work well.

 

There are several possibilities why  you ".........blew a rear tyre at 100kmh on a downhill run..............." 

  • Low tyre pressure
  • Overloaded
  • Axles out of alignment
  • Brake locking on or unequal braking
  • FOD/Bad luck

I would be intersted to know what sort of suspension & braking system your "...professionally well built..." trailer has????

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3 hours ago, onetrack said:

Blueadventures trailer looks like a handling disaster waiting to happen, to me - due to the poor positioning of the wheels/axles in relation to the trailer frame and length.

Trailers should always be constructed with the axles mounted central to the frame - or even better, 50mm to 100mm behind the centre point of the main frame. This ensures good handling, and a resistance to tail-wagging, especially when loaded.

 

A trailer with axles mounted forward of the centre point of the trailer main frame is a guarantee that tail-wagging will result the instant the trailer is loaded, and hauled at highway speed.

You have to remember that a tyre blowout on a rear tyre (always a likelihood), will result in immediate adverse handling, and initiate a tail-wagging event.

 

I've just had that happen to me with a tandem (1.8M x 3.6M) enclosed trailer that is professionally well built with centrally-located axles. I was loaded to the limit, blew a rear tyre at 100kmh on a downhill run, and I can tell you, it took all my trailer handling skills to keep control of it.

It was extremely fortunate at the point where I blew the tyre, the highway was extra wide and there were 3 lanes with a passing lane going the other way, so oncoming vehicles were well out of harms way. As it was, I was over the centre line trying to keep control of the vicious tail wag while trying to come to a halt with one basically tyre-less rim.

 

This was a borrowed trailer from Brian who originally built the Foxcon Terrier aircraft up here and the trailer was made for them as a nose wheel and the weight distribution was setup for that.  I used it to transport back after purchase as it was not in flying condition.

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4 hours ago, onetrack said:

Blueadventures trailer looks like a handling disaster waiting to happen, to me - due to the poor positioning of the wheels/axles in relation to the trailer frame and length.

Trailers should always be constructed with the axles mounted central to the frame - or even better, 50mm to 100mm behind the centre point of the main frame. This ensures good handling, and a resistance to tail-wagging, especially when loaded.

 

A trailer with axles mounted forward of the centre point of the trailer main frame is a guarantee that tail-wagging will result the instant the trailer is loaded, and hauled at highway speed.

You have to remember that a tyre blowout on a rear tyre (always a likelihood), will result in immediate adverse handling, and initiate a tail-wagging event.

 

I've just had that happen to me with a tandem (1.8M x 3.6M) enclosed trailer that is professionally well built with centrally-located axles. I was loaded to the limit, blew a rear tyre at 100kmh on a downhill run, and I can tell you, it took all my trailer handling skills to keep control of it.

It was extremely fortunate at the point where I blew the tyre, the highway was extra wide and there were 3 lanes with a passing lane going the other way, so oncoming vehicles were well out of harms way. As it was, I was over the centre line trying to keep control of the vicious tail wag while trying to come to a halt with one basically tyre-less rim.

 

Onetrack, we know were the centre of gravity is on the aircraft. Ok it may have moved back maybe 200mm? With the wings folded. This still puts the load well ahead of the axles. We also cant see the towball, which makes the pic look worse. I am sure the guy who built it worked it all out.

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Quote

There are several possibilities why  you ".........blew a rear tyre at 100kmh on a downhill run..............." 

Low tyre pressure
Overloaded
Axles out of alignment
Brake locking on or unequal braking
FOD/Bad luck
I would be intersted to know what sort of suspension & braking system your "...professionally well built..." trailer has????

Skippy, I blew the tyre because it was an aged Chinese tyre showing signs of degradation, and I shouldn't have left it on the trailer for the trip. The trailer was loaded to the full 2000kg trailer gross limit.

 

The suspension is a 4-spring leaf suspension with a middle rocker bar, and fully greased shackles. It's as good as they come for a regular-duty tandem trailer suspension.

It has over-ride drum brakes on the front axle only, a fully-legal arrangement in W.A. They provide adequate braking under nearly all conditions except extreme conditions.

 

 

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5 hours ago, spacesailor said:

I see the reason to have the aircraft ' tail ' first .

The hitch weight of the trailer has to be a certain weight .

For safety,  the engine close to the trailer wheels would be good .

spacesailor

not enough weight in an raaus plane to worry about, but towing tail first can cause a lot of stress from buffeting.  

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1 hour ago, Blueadventures said:

This was a borrowed trailer from Brian who originally built the Foxcon Terrier aircraft up here and the trailer was made for them as a nose wheel and the weight distribution was setup for that.  I used it to transport back after purchase as it was not in flying condition.

my trailer was almost identical and towed straight as a die even with one flat tyre. raaus aircraft weigh nothing and as you said the engine is close to the hitch so good weight distribution.

 

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