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Silly aviation pictures.


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Here's one for the funny rego's  --  Easy Peasy.  

Portsmouth NH approach:

Dallas approach.  

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Probably not even need any different parts than what's on standard production models. That's about Lycomings cheapest engine. Trouble is you'd need CS feathering props. Shades of the Australian made DH Drover. Nev

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The Drover was a horrible aircraft: the latter versions had increased dihedral of the stabiliser (in an attempt to improve directional stability?) and got around in a sort of tail-down attitude.

 

At one point, a well known all round aviator in Queensland bought one as a jump ship.

On it's first outing, it took off late afternoon with 10 optimistic skydivers. As teatime came and went, the rest of the DZ retired to the pub, from where, as the evening wore on, they were able to observe the occasional sacrificial jumper being tossed out to further lighten the load as the thing clawed it's way skyward. In fairness, I should say that some improvements were subsequently made...by upgrading the props, I think.

 

Sadly, this story does not seem to have made it's way across the Tasman: several years later, a bunch of jumpers in NZ bought one and repeated the experiment.

 

I don't know what happened to the Oz one.

I'm pretty sure the NZ one met it's end, mercifully chewed beyond repair, in a taxiing accident

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Here's one without a picture - for now. If anyone knows the answer, they can post a photo, otherwise I will on Monday night.

 

What jet aircraft, for the sake of secrecy, was fitted with a fake wooden propeller?

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Correct Flightrite, Bell YP59A Airacomet. Here is the pic:

 

1359283272_FakewoodenpropelleronYP-59AAiracomet.jpg.1a11cc2b46ab5a5fa4e07322abff4b6f.jpg

 

I don't know who they thought they would fool with that!

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Correct Flightrite, Bell YP59A Airacomet. Here is the pic:

 

[ATTACH type=full" alt="Fake wooden propeller on YP-59A Airacomet.jpg]52864[/ATTACH]

 

I don't know who they thought they would fool with that!

I must confess I had to call a friend ( who knows just about everything aviation) to confirm it but recall reading somewhere years ago about the amount of deception that Co's did to hide or give the wrong impression to competitors or the enemy?

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Enemy deception is a complete field in itself, in the military. There are large teams involved in enemy deception.

During WW2, they built dummy airfields complete with buildings, built thousands of tanks and truck dummies, and even produced dummy large scale troop movements, complete with washing on the lines! They even set up dummy harbours!

 

The U.S. started their "Ghost Army", an Engineer group, modelled on the British enemy deception effort in the Middle East, called Operation Bertram.

Where the British used dummy tanks and vehicles built from plywood, the U.S. used inflatables for tanks!

 

The Americans indulged in electronic and signal deception on a huge scale, and even had huge sound systems broadcasting military movement noises!

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Army

 

https://www.wbur.org/news/2012/06/06/ghost-army

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Enemy deception is a complete field in itself, in the military. There are large teams involved in enemy deception.

During WW2, they built dummy airfields complete with buildings, built thousands of tanks and truck dummies, and even produced dummy large scale troop movements, complete with washing on the lines! They even set up dummy harbours!

 

The U.S. started their "Ghost Army", an Engineer group, modelled on the British enemy deception effort in the Middle East, called Operation Bertram.

Where the British used dummy tanks and vehicles built from plywood, the U.S. used inflatables for tanks!

 

The Americans indulged in electronic and signal deception on a huge scale, and even had huge sound systems broadcasting military movement noises!

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Army

 

https://www.wbur.org/news/2012/06/06/ghost-army

 

The Japs flooded the Pacific with confusing messages prior to Dec7 1941. Deception is alive in every field of endeavour from the grubby politicians to little kids playing at kinda!

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