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Has this really been stopped? If so, for how long?

Personally, I liked getting it and read it right through. It helped me to see things from the perspective of the RAAus management, and that is not a bad thing at least for me.

The only criticism I had was the paucity of "nuts n bolts" hands-on stuff, but I reckon this is more from the lack of material than anything else. The only other mag I get is "Kitplanes" and while that mag has more hands-on stuff, it also clearly has difficulty getting enough.

 

I do see the argument about reducing costs for members, but I reckon that owner-maintenance is the biggest cost-saving out there and should be encouraged with "how to" articles.

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Once again Economies of Scale come into play. The proportion of the magazine buying population who would buy aviation-related magazines is very small in comparison to those who buy the gossip mags. It's now very expensive to produce magazines, and harder to get useful copy. How often now do you go to a book to get info for "hands-on" stuff? Now it's into Google to find the manual, or a forum that deal with your enquiry. I've downloaded the manuals for my car, my bike, my power tools etc., etc. If I have a question of a technical nature specific to my bike, I go to a bike forum.

 

For a long time, the content of enthusiast magazines has been advertising orientated with articles strongly related to the advertisers' products.

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Guest Machtuk

Plenty of magazines have gone to the wall in recent times, but like some retail outlets, they are struggling cause a couple of clicks of the fingers and everything you want item wise of info wise is right there, pretty much free, way of the future sadly?

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Sadly the editor and supplier of the magazine was killed in an accident, I guess a replacement is proving difficult to find.

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Yes, the net is not bad, especially this site. But I would still like an illustrated "how to do the 100 hourly service on your engine" article, or series of articles.

Plus, I would like a story about how this was done by a newby who had found a helpful LAME type to help him get going and sign out the work for a while.

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Yes, the net is not bad, especially this site. But I would still like an illustrated "how to do the 100 hourly service on your engine" article, or series of articles.

Plus, I would like a story about how this was done by a newby who had found a helpful LAME type to help him get going and sign out the work for a while.

 

Unfortunately it is not that simple. Take a jabiru for example that is new to the owner, L2 or LAME that is going to do the 100 hourly. It would take hours of research to find out what engine it is, what has been done to it, what the required maintenance is and finally write up the log book legally. The actual maintenance is the easy part.

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Yes Jabiru have a really good manual. It may be the best in the world.

I don't think it is enough by itself for a new person. Jabiru would agree that you need more than the manual if you are just starting out.

I would like to see more training courses and a mentoring system set up, with articles in the magazine in support.

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Excellent service manual produced by the manufacturer, or not, quality maintenance of any machinery relies greatly on experience. Take, for example, the LAME or L2/3 ("maintainer") who has been working on Jabirus for yonks. During that time the maintainer has gone through all those engine problems that beset the engines, and in many cases has suggested solutions to Jabiru. The maintainer has also seen the airframe and electrical problems that have cropped up. The problem for the owner/maintainer is accessing all that experience.

 

I think it's ironic that the dedicated owner/maintainer will have an aircraft that does not develop the problems that develop in an aircraft that is used by every Tom, Dick and Harry.

Edited by old man emu
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Yes Jabiru have a really good manual. It may be the best in the world.

I don't think it is enough by itself for a new person. Jabiru would agree that you need more than the manual if you are just starting out.

I would like to see more training courses and a mentoring system set up, with articles in the magazine in support.

Perhaps a tafe type outboard maintenance course would be worth considering as similar size, engine block material similar, fastenings similar size and required torque, plus electrical install similar. Just my thoughts from experience. Cheers.

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Back to the absence of Sport Pilot. Yup I miss it too -and of course the enthusiasm and dedication of Mark Smith. I had a particular fondness for Brian's work ever since he published that article about his doggo in the footwell, and appreciated his humour and quirky style. But in the few months Mark had the magazine production qualities were really excellent. Maybe Brian would take it back on?

 

The other aviation publication i subscribe to is Australian Flying, which covers much of the same content as Sport Pilot, but with slightly higher production standards. While Sport Pilot could be considered the mouthpiece of RAAus, Australian Flying views RAAus within the wider spectrum of Light and General Aviation. Sometimes I find their perspectives on RAAus and its ambitions refreshing.

 

Australian Flying....Worth a read.

 

Alan

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Yes, the net is not bad, especially this site. But I would still like an illustrated "how to do the 100 hourly service on your engine" article, or series of articles.

Plus, I would like a story about how this was done by a newby who had found a helpful LAME type to help him get going and sign out the work for a while.

You should be referring to the manufacturers manuals and FAA AC 43 for maintenance guidance, not forums like this.

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You should be referring to the manufacturers manuals and FAA AC 43 for maintenance guidance, not forums like this.

 

Yes, and No.

 

Ac-43 and manufacturers' manuals set out the approved techniques for doing maintenance. However, experience comes from encountering situations that the manuals had not thought of, because they deal with best case scenarios. Just look at some of the maintenance topics that have graced this forum that have only occurred once or twice over the whole country, and then look at the suggestions offered by people from all over the country who have dealt with a similar problem, or who have used their experience of related situation to offer constructive suggestions.

 

There's nothing in the manuals to explain yellow stains on the belly of an aircraft, but I think there have been many responses to the call for advice on how to deal with them.

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Has this really been stopped? If so, for how long?

Personally, I liked getting it and read it right through. It helped me to see things from the perspective of the RAAus management, and that is not a bad thing at least for me.

The only criticism I had was the paucity of "nuts n bolts" hands-on stuff, but I reckon this is more from the lack of material than anything else. The only other mag I get is "Kitplanes" and while that mag has more hands-on stuff, it also clearly has difficulty getting enough.

 

I do see the argument about reducing costs for members, but I reckon that owner-maintenance is the biggest cost-saving out there and should be encouraged with "how to" articles.

 

Hi Bruce- Like you I liked getting Sport Pilot even though it was a bit sparse on in-depth reporting and good technical articles. All a bit glamour photos and little critical information.

 

Again like you - I superscribed to "Kitplanes Your home built aircraft authority" for several years. Gave it away when I realised the same (or very similar) stories were being repeated. I got pretty sick of the USA is the greatest that pervades almost every article. The only non American manufacturers/supplies that get a look in are those that have been able to "set up" in the US. I recently bought a Kitplanes of the newsagent shelf - mostly rubbish! reminded me why I dont subscribe any more.

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Guest Machtuk

Hi Bruce- Like you I liked getting Sport Pilot even though it was a bit sparse on in-depth reporting and good technical articles. All a bit glamour photos and little critical information.

 

Again like you - I superscribed to "Kitplanes Your home built aircraft authority" for several years. Gave it away when I realised the same (or very similar) stories were being repeated. I got pretty sick of the USA is the greatest that pervades almost every article. The only non American manufacturers/supplies that get a look in are those that have been able to "set up" in the US. I recently bought a Kitplanes of the newsagent shelf - mostly rubbish! reminded me why I dont subscribe any more.

Most of the periodicals are full of advertising and rubbish! The old 'crash comics' where the best?

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I was paid up till December 2019. I still get a message when I log in to the RAA site that I can renew my subscription. There has still been no decision on what is going to happen. I think it's pretty obvious that it's history. My membership is coming up so I will get them to put whatever is there as a credit on my account.

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It isn't that difficult to do a Youtube video of various procedures. if, for example you want to know how to access the right hand rear door locking mechanism on a Honda Accord 2000, there's a nice 4 minute video. Also for the other doors. No rason not to do one on the Jab 100 hourly. Another one for the paperwork/history stuff before you get started.

Meanwhile I'll put in a plug for the EAA. Join the USA organisation and get access to more stuff than you can poke a stick at. There's even an Australian Chapter. :-)

Yes the US guys are a little insular and USA oriented. Why not? The rest of the world is largely irrelevant to them and ultimately their bureaucrats know that the people they are trying to oppress are armed. It concentrates their tiny brains. See John Ross "Unintended Consequences"

The advertising in the magazines is some of the best content. The web is great but you need to know about the product or website in the first place.

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The US is so big that there are sub-groups to suit us all. I found that the rec aviation types I met were just like us. I didn't meet a crazy religious person but they are just not the sort I associate with here either. I know they have plenty over there.

One guy I met in Nevada was wearing a North Melbourne football t-shirt. I thought he did it for me, but it was because he was a fan and why? Because it was the best game he had ever found on foxtel.

The point is that there are more over there like us than there are here. I like Mike Borgelt's suggestion that we look at the EAA.

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I'm a magazine junkie - Electronics Australia going back 50 years. I learnt so much from magazines in the old days. Today they are full of advertising and very little stuff of real interest.

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Yes, and No.

 

Ac-43 and manufacturers' manuals set out the approved techniques for doing maintenance. However, experience comes from encountering situations that the manuals had not thought of, because they deal with best case scenarios. Just look at some of the maintenance topics that have graced this forum that have only occurred once or twice over the whole country, and then look at the suggestions offered by people from all over the country who have dealt with a similar problem, or who have used their experience of related situation to offer constructive suggestions.

 

There's nothing in the manuals to explain yellow stains on the belly of an aircraft, but I think there have been many responses to the call for advice on how to deal with them.

Agree, however the manuals should be first consulted. I’ve seen way too many people who aren’t aware of the existence or requirement to follow the manufacturers processes and simply “have a go” based on a mates advice.

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Yellow stains? I don't know these either. Please tell me... in the absence of better info, I can only imagine that these are caused by rust in the oil and are a bad sign of internal engine corrosion. Personally, I have never seen them.

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Could even be like a glider I once flew many decades ago. When mother nature called and the instructor passed me a clear plastic tubed to relieve myself in, I asked where dose this go, to a holding tank or somewhere? He replied "No, all over Mrs Browns washing in Basingstoke.:whistling:

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Sport Pilot is returning, great news for anyone who had withdrawal symptoms due to not receiving the monthly sermon from the two m's, just kidding guys if you read this. The very good news is it will be free to all members of RAA, the bad news only 3 times a year. Just posting this for interested people who are not members. Looking forward to it.

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Good to see it return ... but it’s bloody spin to say it’s free - it’s covered by our fees ... it’s not free.

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