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Here's a hairy crosswind landing


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Yes, we see uncountable videos of hairy crosswind landings on Youtube. I'm sure all pilots here will have been taught the "classical" crosswind landing technique - ailerons into wind, opposite rudder. I get that the big jets with engines slung under the wings can't do that because the engines would hit the ground, but I would have thought the aircraft in this video could have done that quite safely with no risk of prop strike. There didn't seem to be any attempt to do so, wonder why not?

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Fail and grounded. No excuse for this, a go around should have been done. The moment they were on the wrong side of the centre line should have rung bells its all gone to hell.

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It would be pretty scary for the passengers but close to terrifying for the crew at the pointy end of the plane. :yikes:

No passengers on that one . It’s a regular freight runner into Birmingham , UK , where this video was shot .

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I can't revisit it now as I don't "facebook" but the early part looked OK. Then it gets too far upwind, lowers the downwind wing (bad move) and eventually when on the ground appears to be steering with the hand controlled nosewheel steering for an erratic cross country drive in the grass . Lack of coordinated control inputs and dubious procedure. for conditions encountered.. The plane is capable of a significant amount of safe wing down but a kick straight needs RUDDER and I never saw it move. Bad day at the office. Maybe a "takeover" in the middle of it ? Going around when it's heading off the strip is not a good idea either..Nev

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What happened to the video?

 

 

Sorry Andy, It was a URL for a Facebook video, and apparently they have a time limit which has expired.

 

Here is a link to the full Youtube video, but unless you have a Youtube account, you will have to put up with a two and a half minute advert before it starts.

 

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How are people supposed to look at it , if they don't have bookface accounts?

Read the post above yours.

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Sorry.....

 

Gee, nice landing.

 

I wonder how many people spilled their coffee? ;)

 

He got 'em down. A bit of an excursion, but.... The plane was (looks) serviceable.

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Sorry.....

 

Gee, nice landing.

 

I wonder how many people spilled their coffee? ;)

 

He got 'em down. A bit of an excursion, but.... The plane was (looks) serviceable.

 

Freighter so anyone spilling their coffee where stowaways!??

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Hmmm, thinking back to my training days, I did learn to do "standard type" crosswind landings but my instructor also taught me a different technique, not sure how it would work in a fixed wing aircraft but certainly was a good alternative in a trike. Basically, on the downwind leg, take note of the x wind factor (via wind sock) then on base, fly past the end of runway to a point where, as you turn to final you can line up the trike with the end of runway directly into the wind (or relatively close to) this actually makes the decent into the runway somewhat easier than a x wind battle from height. The trick was to come in low & level (l&l) over the fence and be ready to touch down on that side of the runway, just before touch down the wing was pushed out to turn the trike onto the runway.

 

eg: Landing on Rwy 18, on base, fly east, past end of Rwy then turn into wind aiming at that end, come in l&l over fence and aim to land close to the edge of the Rwy, as trike is about to land push flight bar out to the left which will swing the trike to the right and down the Rwy. From memory, the trick is to make sure the right wheel (in this scenario) contacts the Rwy as the wing is pushed out, as the wheel contact will help to bring the trike around and onto the Rwy, as the trike settles on the deck the steer wheel is adjusted to straighten the aircraft down the Rwy and windward side of wing is lowered into the wind to stop it from getting wind caught under it. Done correctly it is easy on the pilot and aircraft as most of the landing is directly into the wind, no manhandling the trike onto the deck. I hope I have explained it well enough, it was actually harder to put into words than I remember it being at the time.

 

Obviously it might be easier on some airfields than others but where I learned it is a sealed Rwy with off side turn outs at each end so extra room to land.

Cheers.

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