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You're flying in my old stamping ground. (out of West Maitland ) It's all pretty rough country and I'm not surprised you got a rough ride. It also has areas where the cloud can catch you as the topography gets a bit elevated,. Barrington often used to get snow. Watch the freezing level. You have NO anti icing.  Nev

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Clouds will indicate rough air often when they are around to help you. Smooth edged ones are fairly harmless (lenticular).  Mountain ridges  are suss when there's a known wind prevailing. Talk to your Instructor and read on it. Gliding weather books can be a good source. That's what I used in my early DAYS. You're an airman and best to know about the air. Watch for Sea breezes moving through when you are going to coastal places. Their effect can be substantial and well inland from the coast..  Nev

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7 hours ago, facthunter said:

You're flying in my old stamping ground. (out of West Maitland ) It's all pretty rough country and I'm not surprised you got a rough ride. It also has areas where the cloud can catch you as the topography gets a bit elevated,. Barrington often used to get snow. Watch the freezing level. You have NO anti icing.  Nev

Hi Nev

yeah I watched for that with temps hovering around  +1 just below the cloud ~ 4k-5k ..

....It certainly causes a rethink of just enjoying flying in one's local region, just to enjoy flying like a bird

or ,

doing long trips that inevitably may suffer bad weather over days and days of the same forecast (that was this case) . I was prepared to turn around and head back anytime, the pinch being Rylstone region. I see there is also an option of going around the top at Gulgong and following the main road. That's all a bit lower, and a bit further north, all helps.

 

The technically difficult nature is one of the things that draws me to flying. A hard task outside my electronics world.  I studied the hell out of that route, got lots of info from others , plane prep-ed. But curiosity can also kill the cat.

 

again I think it comes down to being open to  turn around or change plan no matter how inconvenient.  , and recognising a potentially hazardous scenario unfolding. My 19,000 hour instructor, Rob Glenn, is full of anecdotes and real world examples or things that can happen.

 

 

Edited by RFguy
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There's an enormous contrast flying east from Cowra, and flying west.

Flying west is hot but there's nothing around, and usually not much moisture. maybe the odd gusty change, and hazardous willy willy near the ground.

But flying east... Death is everywhere, rocks in clouds, low ceilings, rising ground, unforgivable terrain , wind and eddys, lots of moisture, and  the oceanic effects colliding with the westerlies from the other direction....

I'm sure every region has similarities and can catch people.....The  far north Queensland coast and hinterland comes to mind.

 

Who else has their story of this ?

 

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2 hours ago, RFguy said:

Who else has their story of this ?

I did a trip from Bairnsdale to Cessnock in early January one year. No worries about rain and clouds, but hot as hades, massive turbulence the whole way and dense haze through Sydney. Flying solo, I had no extra pair of eyes, and was utterly exhausted by the time I got to Cessnock. Didn’t fly for a while after that one…

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Thanks for sharing Glen. Coming home from the Wanaka airshow recently I was crossing Cook Strait when the weather at destination clagged in. I followed the East Coast of the North Island to a small 500m strip next to the coast and landed there in deteriorating conditions a few minutes into my fuel reserve. This was not the forecast. Always have an out (or two)..

WF-FT.jpg

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Good choice Kiwi . My NZ glider mates tell me that that east coast run  is not fun with a westerly blowing, either. If you don't like wind and turb in NZ, you might not fly much.

 

and sfGnome , .,. yes I feel the same way, I'll stay out of my airplane for a couple of weeks . It's not scary, it's just no fun. Maybe its like having a 3 hour colonoscopy or something.

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