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Not as funny as it sounds, the Willawong Tip in Brisbane is still open to the public, however a man was fined yesterday for going there.

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Police have confirmed that going to the tip to dump rubbish, is allowed under lockdown rules. But going to the tip just for a drive, or to scrounge some saleable scrap, isn't.

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OK after further research the Qld Police commissioner has stated the fines will be revoked.

Essentially if a business can stay open under the rules then people can use that business so long as the follow social distancing guidelines.

 

ie We had an over zealous copper which as I see it is the biggest risk in all of this, some bullies using this crisis to flex muscle that they have no right to flex.

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Brother in law witnessed bloke fined by cops after leaving Bunnings with a plant - not essential says plod.

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Rename all plants essential "this" and essential "that" and have someone to read it out where necessary. They might have been told to act on all "tip off's" and don't rule out "Planting" evidence...Nev

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It's getting pretty petty when it comes back to what you're buying at Bunnings. Here in the West, no-one bothers what you buy at Bunnings, just as long as the numbers in the store are limited, and the 1.5M personal spacing is observed.

We went to Bunnings and bought paint, sanders, sanding discs, paint rollers and paintbrushes - so we could have a blitz on house maintenance. No-one bothered us, there are no Police guarding Bunnings, I think that's overkill.

 

The Police here are simply manning regional roadblocks to prevent unnecessary travel, and about 98% of travellers are let through, because they're moving freight or are engaged in essential jobs.

They are policing large gatherings and parties that are reported. People in W.A. are allowed to go to the beach, just have to space themselves out, and not gather in groups.

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Brother in law witnessed bloke fined by cops after leaving Bunnings with a plant - not essential says plod.

It wouldn't be difficult then to argue that the fat moll outside the takeaway shop with the other fat molls is not carrying out essential business, given that most of the ones I see could easily go 3 weeks with nothing but water. :amazon:

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We went to Bunnings and bought paint, sanders, sanding discs, paint rollers and paintbrushes - so we could have a blitz on house maintenance. No-one bothered us, there are no Police guarding Bunnings, I think that's overkill.

Based on what I've seen on here, there are some that would argue that if you bought some reno supplies and fell off your ladder or took a finger off with your circular saw you'd be unnecessarily tying up emergency services and there may be no hospital beds available.:faint:

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Go to Bunnings and buy whatever you need for jobs around the home. If stopped, simply explain that you need to purchase stuff to reduce your stress levels by doing something (psychological reason), or that you are getting the stuff to prevent your other half getting arrested for domestic violence if you keep sitting around the house doing nothing.

 

I want to go for a ride on my bike, so I checked how far I could go. I can make it to Camden and The Oaks airports and still not stray more than 20 kms from home (as the crow flies).

 

Does maintenance of personal property count as a reason to travel? If so, can you travel to the airport to service your plane?

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Interestingly my first job tomorrow is to collect a container of surgical gloves ex China and deliver to a medical supply company.

So stuff is still coming in from China.

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Interestingly my first job tomorrow is to collect a container of surgical gloves ex China and deliver to a medical supply company.

So stuff is still coming in from China.

 

Be interesting to hear the feedback from the Oz supplier.

 

 

 

 

 

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My workshop neighbour is a truckie hauling dry freight vans (subbying to Toll) for mostly Coles and Woolworths. He runs their goods from their distribution centres around Perth, to the shopping centres.

He did say about 8 or 10 days ago, that they were starting see delays in getting supplies from China - because of the lockdowns. There were quite a few ships half-loaded in China, and they were unable to finish loading them.

But since then, most of China has started to open up again, and the goods are starting to move again. He did say, what was making it worse, was the panic buying here.

He mentioned they normally put 130 semi-trailers a day through the distribution centre, but it was up to 190 trailers on some days, and it was utter bedlam. But things have started to return to normal.

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My workshop neighbour is a truckie hauling dry freight vans (subbying to Toll) for mostly Coles and Woolworths. He runs their goods from their distribution centres around Perth, to the shopping centres.

He did say about 8 or 10 days ago, that they were starting see delays in getting supplies from China - because of the lockdowns. There were quite a few ships half-loaded in China, and they were unable to finish loading them.

But since then, most of China has started to open up again, and the goods are starting to move again. He did say, what was making it worse, was the panic buying here.

He mentioned they normally put 130 semi-trailers a day through the distribution centre, but it was up to 190 trailers on some days, and it was utter bedlam. But things have started to return to normal.

 

That’s a relief - I’ve got a big shopping list to fill at Bunnings..?

 

 

On a related subject. Something is brewing re not putting all the manufacturing eggs in China...

 

“...Japan is paying its companies to leave China and relocate production elsewhere as part of a stimulus deal in response to the Chinese coronavirus...”

 

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/04/10/japan-to-pay-companies-to-leave-china-relocate-production-over-coronavirus/

 

 

 

 

 

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The re-location of manufacturing out of China makes a lot of economic, political and strategic sense. It will happen in every country, not just Japan.

 

Here's the full original article, not the Breitbart sanitised and shortened version ....

 

https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3079126/japan-pay-firms-leave-china-relocate-production-elsewhere-part

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Karma is having a wow of a time kicking bean counters in the bum. You can't improve the lot of your own people if you give their work away to other countries.

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The re-location of manufacturing out of China makes a lot of economic, political and strategic sense. It will happen in every country, not just Japan.

Here's the full original article, not the Breitbart sanitised and shortened version ....

https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3079126/japan-pay-firms-leave-china-relocate-production-elsewhere-part

That's a theme developing in Australia too, mainly from people with no manufacturing experience.

The theme misses the critical factor that the consumer will always make that choice.

Where is your T shirt made, jocks, trousers, socks, shoes pens, calculator, computer, desk, chair, furniture, plaster roof tiles, in fact anythong that can be fitted into a container.

Laurence Hartnett got GM to set up car production in Australia, so we would never be short of cars again after Britain cut off supply at the beginning of WW2.

This theme is a repeat of that, but would your really pay for the amortisation and high unit cost for Australian products?

We currently buy bacon with 2% Australian content, the packaging, would we pay five times that cost for Australian bacon?

Would you pay $40.00 for $10.00 shoes?

Would you pay $350.00 for a $50.00 electric drill?

.......and so on.

If this theme is to succeed it has to start with a gigantic mind-shift by the consumer.

Let's not forget that the average consumer who works is paying higher taxes to cover payouts for the millions who don't, higher taxes for an artificial fuel price (which is currently quietly being manipulated back up by an agreement to cut oil production), higher taxes and emission costs on cars, higher Council rates, a GST system that didn't replace all other taxes, but now adds 10% on most other excises and taxes, and so on.

It has been largely China's ability to offer low consumer prices along with partners working that's allowed us to have a reasonable standard of living in recent decades.

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My experience of Sweden is that they are happy to pay more for locally sourced good quality products. It must be a mindset.

Saab and Scania went broke.

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I'm quite happy to pay twice as much for Australian-made shoes that fit my feet properly and neatly, and which give me proper balance - unlike the Chinese $20 rubbish footwear that is designed to fit the weird-shaped feet of Chinese peasants, and which footwear throws you off balance when you stand up, because they haven't figured out to build soles with the proper contours.

I'm quite happy to pay twice as much for Australian-made pens that have inbuilt durability, and which work every time you put them to paper, and which last three times as long as rubbishy Chinese pens that end up in wastebaskets in two weeks.

I buy Australian bacon where I can now, and it doesn't cost five times as much as crap Canadian or Danish bacon.

 

I think this current economic, cultural, workplace, health and environmental shakeup is what is needed, and it will make many people think about what they are doing, with the race to the bottom, as it has currently stood, by way of buying the very cheapest, throwaway product, that will barely do the job.

As I've mentioned before, I once had to work in a landfill for a few months - and what I saw there, everyone should be compelled to see - waste on a scale unparalleled in our cultural history - and most of it, Chinese rubbish.

China is doing a great whinge about taking our recyclables, and has been refusing to do so. I think its way past time we stopped taking their manufactured rubbish, and filling our landfills with it.

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Scania has only gone bankrupt once, in 1921, after the upheaval of WW1. There was a worldwide economic recession in 1920-1922. Saab never ever got on top of its design, reliability, buyer acceptance, or manufacturing problems.

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