Jump to content

RAAF to take ownership of Temora aircraft


Recommended Posts

once they do the risk assessment is done, it will be a game of risk minimization.

 

RAAF to take ownership of Temora aircraft

 

Changes at Temora

 

The Temora museum marks its 20th birthday next year and its aircraft will play an important part in the RAAF’s 100th anniversary celebrations in 2021. Picture Credit: Colin Turner

 

30 April 2019

 

A substantial change to the Temora Aviation Museum comes into effect on 1 July this year when the RAAF takes over ownership of 11 of the museum’s fleet of warbirds.

 

Nearly two years in the making, this has been done to ensure the museum’s future and has no effect on its day-to-day running. Visitors to the museum’s Showcase flying days and future Warbirds Downunder shows will notice no difference.

 

Most importantly, the aircraft must remain at Temora under the terms of the contracts which have been put in place.

 

Key points:

 

  • The arrangement covers an initial period of five years starting 1 July 2019 and will be reviewed annually.
     
  • The aircraft being transferred to the RAAF are Spitfires VH-HET and VH-XVI, Hudson VH-KOY, Boomerang VH-MHR, Ryan STM VH-RSY, Wirraway VH-BFF, A-37 Dragonfly VH-XVA, Canberra VH-ZSQ, Vampire VH-VAM, Meteor VH-MBX and Tiger Moth VH-UVZ.
     
  • Those not being transferred are Dragonfly VH-DLO and Cessna O-2 VH-OII.
     
  • The aircraft will remain based at Temora.
     
  • Temora Aviation Museum Engineering Pty Ltd will continue to provide maintenance and engineering support for the aircraft, under contract to the RAAF.
     
  • Temora Historic Flight Club continues as the museum’s flying operations entity.
     
  • Selected civilian pilots flying the aircraft will be offered appointment to the RAAF Reserve as ‘specialist capability officers’ to satisfy the various legal and regulatory requirements.
     
  • The museum’s top management remains as before: chief executive Murray Kear, general manager Peter Harper and chief engineer Andrew Bishop.
     
  • Privately-owned visiting warbirds will continue to fly at the museum’s events.
     

 

The museum marks its 20th birthday next year and its aircraft will play an important part in the RAAF’s 100th anniversary celebrations in 2021.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the RAAF centenary was celebrated at Pt Cook on 2 March 2014. I remember it well, as I arranged to have my cancer surgery deferred so I could attend, and went under the knife two days after the airshow. I have a total of 63 photos from the airshow.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First flight at Point Cook was in 2014, Australian Flying Corps. The Australian Air Force was formed on 31 March 1921. The king approved the prefix "Royal" in June 1921 and it became effective on 31 August 1921.

 

 

  • Informative 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The arrangement covers an initial period of five years starting 1 July 2019 and will be reviewed annually.

Well that's as clear as mud...Everything stays the same, except when it's reviewed and changed I guess.

 

I wonder if the RAA did any consulting on it? ....

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that's as clear as mud...Everything stays the same, except when it's reviewed and changed I guess.

 

I wonder if the RAA did any consulting on it? ....

It has nothing to do with the raaus

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the RAAF centenary was celebrated at Pt Cook on 2 March 2014. I remember it well, as I arranged to have my cancer surgery deferred so I could attend, and went under the knife two days after the airshow. I have a total of 63 photos from the airshow.

...and none from the surgery

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was being sarcastic....

Oh.. Crap.

 

Sorry mate, haha I was genuinely confused... Now I see the innuendo... Hey, I'm on night-shift! That's my excuse and I'm sticking to it

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

This is interesting.  David Lowy owns Temora, so this is a cosy political favour for him or his dad.  This way, David gets his cake and eats it too....   and we pay the bill.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The cost of running Temora over the last 20 years would be big dollars. Say what you like about David and his family but the bloke is a passionate aviator and funded everything there. The entrance fee people paid for museum entry wouldn't have covered the taxi fuel of the aircraft. Australians had a chance to see some classic aircraft thanks to David.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

With out David it would not be there for us to enjoy.   If he can get something out of it while we enjoy it then great.   If you dont like it, either dont go there or deal with it, dont spoil it for the many many australians that have enjoyed the museum and the facilities the airport has.   Some people are never happy unless they try to spoil it for anyone else.

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, I don't have anything against David at all, in fact, I'm glad I'm not in his shoes.  Do you know him, or at least know his story?   His life hasn't been easy.  All I said was that it's a tax dodge, and it's his hobby.  Both true.   The inference about us already paying relates to his source of income, and that's certainly not his fault.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

" If he can get something out of it while we enjoy it then great. "

 

I enjoyed the museum & I agree, that if, Like an instructor who gets free flying whilst training us.

 

I say ! Thank you David.

 

spacesailor

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a tax dodge and it pays for his hobby.  If entry into the museum was free, we'd still be paying too much if we knew how much we've paid already.

 

Tax dodges can’t pay for hobbies. You only get back 30 or ? 47c back per dollar. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had my hands on Three aircraft, that would have been suitable for HAR's.

 

BUT

 

I have No means of Keeping  or flying those , 

 

But if HAR's people looked after them & took me flying in them,  "It would be a tax dodge".

 

spacesailor

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But I do know David has done a great deal and has at times used his own money.

 

And for those who have open minds,

 

I do not know of the tax arrangements but the old man is in one of his harbour mansions as we converse. So is his massive yacht, its getting a mega buck entertainment install at the moment.

 

 

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, please refrain from any further derogative posts against other users and lets all keep our chats friendly...thanks

 

Some posts have been removed

 

 

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had my hands on Three aircraft, that would have been suitable for HAR's.

 

BUT

 

I have No means of Keeping  or flying those , 

 

But if HAR's people looked after them & took me flying in them,  "It would be a tax dodge".

 

spacesailor

 

My expirence with HARs was a bit negative. A HARs aircraft had broken down at a regional airfield, we flew over, landed and parked near to take a look. We approached the aircraft where 2 people were working. As we came closer one of the people said abruptly "I wouldn't get too close or you'll finish up with a spanner through the head." Now if there was a danger his warning could have been a bit more civil, we were prepared to make a donation for a closer look but with the aggressive attitude we were taken aback. I know you have to put up with all sorts of numptys around aircraft, we flew in and parked near the HARs aircraft so they would have seen we had some idea about aviation. Seemed to me a heavily government funded museum was just an "Old boys club" for selected few to play with publicly funded toys like they were their own. I might have just struck those on a bad hair day,

 

I didn't think they promoted HARs in a good light.

 

By comparison I have visited Temora many times and each time have been treated very well by staff with pilots, engineers and ground staff all being very helpful and courteous and only too pleased to interact with the puplic. David even mingling with the crown being open and approachable.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...