Jump to content

Recommended Posts

When the expressway came through Gawler airfield, those of us who had T hangars expected similar replacements. Instead, we got standard sheds because they were easier for a contractor.

I reckon the standard shed is easier to operate and much better when you want to work on the plane. So I recommend that you have standing height everywhere and only one door. Nice idea that roll-up door. My old tee hangar had 7 doors.

What UV life does your covering have?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 76
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Here's where mines at... still got to enclose the back... all materials and delivery for structure came in under $7000..    

Doors are coming but the view is so nice from the house.😍😍  

In the early days of the pandemic I had plenty of spare time and 10 litres of white paint so I painted the internal framework of my hangar to smarten it up a bit. Worked out OK.

Posted Images

Mine was originally a hay shed which fell over in a stiff breeze ? I had purchased 44 hectares and conveniently the shed was just round the corner. I made myself a promise that if I could rebuild the hanger I would build a house . I now live in a straw bale house with a hanger 20 meters away

Pics! Would like to see this. Pics please! I’ve enjoyed seeing all the hangar variations. I’ve built in rammed earth first house then as seen (iTunes/ Foxtel/ free to air ABC) Grand Designs Australia in rock, glass, Coreten and spotted gum.

 

I’m hoping to get back to Australia later this year and put in a runway and hangar on French island. Will definitely use idea from here. Current winning idea is combination of farm shed with the carriage and rail system and ability to store 2 or 3 planes. Mine and visitors!

https://www.completehome.com.au/new-homes/american-inspired-grand-design-french-island.html

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

What UV life does your covering have?

I was also thinking that. Probably want as dark as possible and I’ve even thought about humidity control. I’ll put a hangar 1.3km from seaside and it’d be nice to have a dehumidifier for longer storage periods. Maybe a custom tent type arrangement and just control a small amount of air.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was also thinking that. Probably want as dark as possible and I’ve even thought about humidity control. I’ll put a hangar 1.3km from seaside and it’d be nice to have a dehumidifier for longer storage periods. Maybe a custom tent type arrangement and just control a small amount of air.

Some coastal location are killers for humidity, which can corrode your pride and joy in no time. My mate in Darwin has an awesome collection of motorcycles, but rust appears everywhere, no matter what he coats them with. A bloke in Cairns built his Motorcycle museum in an old cold store with thick insulation. He seems to have beaten corrosion with airconditioning, which keeps humidity low.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Old Koreelah I had an interesting experience during my build here: had a lot of components on shelves up the wall, and discovered that parts with a lot of mass (wheel hubs, prop extension), which I had stored lower down, were 'sweating' like a cold beer some mornings. I moved them higher in the racking while also improving the seal along the bottom of my shed doors, and the problem went away.

 

I also had a lot to do with coolstores, blast freezers etc during my working life.

A particular challenge was the marching beam chillers that receive the carcasses in a meat works: they are prone to a great deal of front end condensation at start of shift, which then drips and becomes a health and safety nono. We tried a variety of things...colder evaporator to strip moisture, extra fans driving air around...then a visiting engineer said something that caused the penny to drop: in a humid environment, you will get condensation on anything that is colder than the air temp.

Armed with that info, we fixed the problem in about 4 hrs by implementing an automatic procedure that warmed the front end of the freezer for a couple of hours before startup. All condensation ceased, and after startup we were able to resume normal refrigeration, with the walls , ceiling, steelwork and air all settling to the same temp.

 

Regarding your buddy with the coldstore/museum: refrigeration is routinely used for stripping moisture, and cheap coolstores do it better than expensive ones. The reason being that cheap coolstores often have undersized evaporators, which have to be run colder, and so condense more effectively.

In produce storage this can be a real issue: the produce dries out. In something like freezedrying, however, it is exactly what you want: it is the freezing that strips the moisture.

  • Like 3
  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pics! Would like to see this. Pics please! I’ve enjoyed seeing all the hangar variations. I’ve built in rammed earth first house then as seen (iTunes/ Foxtel/ free to air ABC) Grand Designs Australia in rock, glass, Coreten and spotted gum.

 

I’m hoping to get back to Australia later this year and put in a runway and hangar on French island. Will definitely use idea from here. Current winning idea is combination of farm shed with the carriage and rail system and ability to store 2 or 3 planes. Mine and visitors!

https://www.completehome.com.au/new-homes/american-inspired-grand-design-french-island.html

Email me [email protected]

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You’ve got aeroplane AND horses. You must be very poor!

They’re horse float looking bags of fertiliser.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I currently have a wood arch, white fabric roof hangar with a roll-up fabric door. I used lots of polycarbonate on the front and back walls and get lots of natural light.

Because there may be a move required in the future, I'm looking for something simpler. I've been toying with designing/building a T-Hangar by combining a 40' and 20' container with most of the side cut out of the 40' - again with a fabric roll-up door.

I'd love to get the pros and cons from anyone who has already done something like this.

C

Hi Dan At my last hangar we used shade cloth as the doors. Two piece. Was pulled to the sides to open. The cloth ran on stainless steel wire top and bottom. We had fabric sewn to the top and bottom with eyelets in it to allow 'D' shackles attached. Got the s/s wire at 12mm for a mates sail boat servicing as discarded stay wires at zero cost. Cheers.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy Dome shelters that fit between 2 x 40' seatainers. They're very popular with the miners and mining contractors for cheap covered storage.

 

One of their advantages is that they can be moved or resold easily. This would be pretty important if you wanted to build a hangar at an airstrip where you weren't the landowner.

 

https://www.domeshelter.com.au/steel-shed-or-dome-shelter/

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my hangar, in which I assembled my carrier and aircraft.

Most of the modifications were installed in here as well. It's a bit of a squeeze, but has several advantages:

I can slide over the wing to get under the instrument panel; it's right next to my workshop, so I can work on my plane pretty much anytime and it's quite secure.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.81ad2ab78c94e67d82d922839ea6fe0f.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.6e5b50209e4cb3a4dbfd88097dc2e9cb.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my hangar, in which I assembled my carrier and aircraft.

Most of the modifications were installed in here as well. It's a bit of a squeeze, but has several advantages:

I can slide over the wing to get under the instrument panel; it's right next to my workshop, so I can work on my plane pretty much anytime and it's quite secure.

 

[ATTACH alt=image.jpeg]52942[/ATTACH][ATTACH alt=image.jpeg]52943[/ATTACH]

You don't have a hangar you have an "Aircraft Carrier". Good to let slip at the appropriate moment at the Pub.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't have a hangar you have an "Aircraft Carrier". Good to let slip at the appropriate moment at the Pub.

The Pub? Here's hoping that one day we'll all be able to front up to the bar once again..

Of course, it's an 8m aircraft carrier with built-in aircraft-recovery mechanism.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good onyer old K. I'm going to start calling my old glider trailer an aircraft carrier. I hope you don't have copyright on that idea.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

hangar.JPG.0f76f17d0426afb66244b29759a4b7b2.JPG

 

Taken just before the Colt was stripped of its fabric for a rebuild.

Bits and pieces are now everywhere! I am a little OCD so everything is photographed, labeled and packaged ready to put together.

I am a bit of a clean freak and could probably do open heart surgery in it .

Sad as it is, I have planted lawn and done landscaping as well. Recon it's the only way I will get Hangar Of The Year (HOTY) in Hangar and Gardens magazine.

Ken

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

...Bits and pieces are now everywhere! I am a little OCD so everything is photographed, labeled and packaged ready to put together....

Impressive hangar, Ken.

I suspect that a pilot needs to be on the OCD spectrum. The worst case I've seen should have been called CDO: the letters had to be in alphabetical order!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

T88, there a a few pics of it around as it has been here for so long, all in SA. It is a low hours a/c and was only taken from the skies due to belly fabric failing the test. I could have just replaced the belly section and it would have been airborne and that was the recommendation of our LAME.

But decided to do the whole thing. Once the fabric was removed is was all good underneath the petticoat. looking at some STCs to make it the best and simplest day VFR it can be. Engine has only 230 hours.

Ken

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

You could take out the panel and mount something like an early Pacer one there, they have rounded edges and a lot lower. I doubt there'd be any paperwork needed because it was an earlier Piper panel, factory fit. Still enough room for ASI, ALT, T+B, Tacho and combination oil pressure/oil temp. Those along with a bouncy mag compass on the dash and your set.

Colt is a very appealing aircraft, basic flying at it's best.

We had a Tri, was a lovely little machine.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Reference 'way back to post #25. (I've been on different assignments while trapped inside by COVID-19...……………….)

The properly installed fabric should last a minimum of 7-9 years - probably longer here - in temperate Nova Scotia. A replacement roof costs about CDN $800.00 from the manufacturer.

The fabric door hangs on a sewn-in rope cord along the top that is captured above a board screwed to the header. There is a pocket along the bottom of the fabric door that carries a 32 foot long, 2" steel pipe. Cut-outs in this pocket allow for ratchet tie-downs when the door is closed. Four spaced nylon straps operate the door. One end of each is suspended outside on the header, loops down and under the pipe and back up to a gimballed roller supported on the inside of the header. From here, the straps connect to steel cables that cross to the back wall of hangar where pulleys direct the cable down to a floor-level hand-operated winch. The left and right "flaps" of the fabric serve as man-doors and are folded inwards to roll up the door (50 handle cranks of the winch). It has all worked well since 2014 and the fabric shows no signs of deterioration. The building was located to be somewhat sheltered from the nasty nor'easters we sometimes get up here.

I-Bob: I like the simplicity of the fabric door that opens laterally on cables - that arrangement would greatly reduce the weight being carried by the header on my hangar - I've made a note of that. How was flight life during your summer?

 

CanadaDan

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I-Bob: I like the simplicity of the fabric door that opens laterally on cables - that arrangement would greatly reduce the weight being carried by the header on my hangar - I've made a note of that."

 

Hi Dan Tonner, I think it was Blueadventures above who mentioned laterally opening fabric doors. I know nothing about them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Put a shade cloth roller door on the thruster hangar today with the help of forky. Two layers of 90%, pleased with the result.

Resized_20200601_151841_4296.thumb.jpg.04157924b113de25bc4e7fa5718b63e0.jpgResized_20200603_140944_5031.thumb.jpg.7f6df9f96e125aa2ac1269e17f47f7dc.jpgResized_20200603_154447_8672.thumb.jpg.dc0f01ff6d77f34ed2227c50fd7dee91.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...