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Vans RV-7 crash, S of Charters Towers 23/04/2021


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The ABC and Channel Nine are reporting that an RV-7 has crashed S of Charters Towers at around 12:30PM today. The pilot is deceased. No further news available at this point in time.

 

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A little story about Ray and the love he had for his RV. RIP.   https://www.vansaircraft.com/first-flights/ray-williams-rv-7a/

Butch it's not necessarily the years you do but what you do in those years.. Its the good training rather than the time you have spent...  I acknowledge it's HARDER to obtain NOW than when I did it. T

Its not “ageism” is just the facts.   Most any police/atsb/ntsb or any other acronym organisation reports in this standard way   ”An (insert age) (insert place of residence) (inser

Further reporting states the pilot was 74 yrs old, and he was conducting a flight from Winton to Bowen when he crashed on Nosnillor Station. The ATSB has sent investigators, so the aircraft must have been VH registered.

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On 24/04/2021 at 7:12 AM, gareth lacey said:

Whats his age have to do with it,ageism working again, condolences to his family

 

Its not “ageism” is just the facts.

 

Most any police/atsb/ntsb or any other acronym organisation reports in this standard way

 

”An (insert age) (insert place of residence) (insert gender/s) died/was injured as a result of a (insert vehicle type) crash, at (insert place and time)”

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There was a news clip this morning that it due to an inflight breakup......

Any further news??

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Posted (edited)

In flight breakup ... theyd only put that in the prelim ATSB report if bits of the aircraft were located afield the impact site... 

aircraft was in a massive dive. 3000 fpm  then 4500 fpm (assume rate is in meters since altitude is in meters) ? surely it would only descend  that fast if pointed at the ground ?  and the heading is going around in circles.

oh boy.

Edited by RFguy
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That's in the range of possible spin descent speed but a spiral is a more likely way to end up in cloud. with whatever speed you might guess at. Could easily exceed 12,000 fpm. Nev

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OK, and as I understand it, in terminology, a spiral , the plane is flying, just flying in a spiral, the classic spin, the aircraft is  in a stall.

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When you do spin training the first thing is to determine is whether it's a spin or a spiral as the recovery is different. If your airspeed is about the stall speed and NOT increasing  you are spinning, if the aircraft has the turn needle to one side. IF the speed IS increasing you are not stalled and your ailerons will do what they normally do and will  let you take the bank off and the turn stops and you then pull it (carefully) out of the dive it's in. You don't want to delay this as the speed and aircraft loads build up fast.

  Note .There was a lot more but somehow it went somewhere and I can't recover it. That's been happening a lot lately. If you want more I'll go back to it. Nev

Edited by facthunter
clarity
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Deepest condolences to friends and family.

 

A spital dive unchecked or pulled out of too quickly will likely lead to a break-up before you hit the ground (depending on altitude, of course).  We had to practice them as part of the PPL and the acceleration is scarily quick and the ASI winds up accordingly. Also a tell tale if a dive over a spin is the increasing air and prop noise..

 

In GA aircraft I have trained in, recovery of a spiral dive is throttle back, wings level with aileron and then arrest descent with elevator - gently..

 

I don't know Aussie regs, but if an aircraft is a homebuild (are any Vans not homebuild?), how does it end up on the VH register (whcih I thought - possibly incorrectly - is for certificated GA aircraft?

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2 minutes ago, Jerry_Atrick said:

Deepest condolences to friends and family.

 

I don't know Aussie regs, but if an aircraft is a homebuild (are any Vans not homebuild?), how does it end up on the VH register (whcih I thought - possibly incorrectly - is for certificated GA aircraft?

Amateur built is the number three manufacturer on the oz VH register with 1650 items. About 500 of these are RV aircraft. Only some of the RV12's (the lsa model) are factory built.   

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My own experiences- my exposure to spirals, so far, are steep turns  (60+ deg) without nose held up sufficiently.  attitude decays of course. I've did a few of those early on.  (in VFR, lots of altitude)

... it is certainly surprising how fast the airspeed builds up. winds up quick through the yellow inside half a turn, a full turn at that rate of acceleration would be hazardous to the aircraft. 

 

there is some feedback- the controls  begin to get heavy....more reasons to fly with just the tips of your fingers on the stick...  compared to a fist on it.  so to speak.

 

 fortunately, easy fix (throttle back, wings level, fix descent  gently) 

 

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13 hours ago, facthunter said:

You don't want to delay this as the speed and aircraft loads build up fast.

 Very, very fast in an RV7/7A.  Because of the seating position, and the cutaway of the engine cowling, pilots don't realise that the RV is actually in a greater nose down + angle-of-bank than they perceive.  Believe me, they get away very quickly!  (1500+ on RVs and lots of test flying &  instruction). Given that the normal cruise IAS is somewhere up near 140 KIAS at 7-8000 ft - you are really 'chancing your arm'   when the aircraft has a Va = 123 KIAS.  Remember, this is only if the MTOW is at its' maximum allowable - anything less, and the Va is less than the 123 KIAS quoted.  It seems unlikely that with a single crew,  this 7A was anywhere near MTOW - so its' Va would likely have been far less than 123 KIAS.     RIP.

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4 hours ago, Jerry_Atrick said:

Deepest condolences to friends and family.

 

A spital dive unchecked or pulled out of too quickly will likely lead to a break-up before you hit the ground (depending on altitude, of course).  We had to practice them as part of the PPL and the acceleration is scarily quick and the ASI winds up accordingly. Also a tell tale if a dive over a spin is the increasing air and prop noise..

 

In GA aircraft I have trained in, recovery of a spiral dive is throttle back, wings level with aileron and then arrest descent with elevator - gently..

 

I don't know Aussie regs, but if an aircraft is a homebuild (are any Vans not homebuild?), how does it end up on the VH register (whcih I thought - possibly incorrectly - is for certificated GA aircraft?

My Zenith CH701 is homebuilt on the VH register although it equally could be registered on the RAA system. Happens that I already had a PPL so it was just more convenient to register it thus!

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Another factor contributing to  structural overload in a spiral is trying to recover the loss of height by pulling back on the stick. (A very natural tendency).. In IMC  or at night with no horizon especially. The "graveyard SPIRAL" is probably more dangerous than a spin, where Visibility is reduced. Nev

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One good thing is that you can cut the throttle while you are working out what is going on. It is the first step for spins and spirals. (Disclaimer: I have 120 hours.)

 

Next, check the airspeed. If is fast, level your wings with the AH. (or turn indicator or DG). If it is slow,  stop the turn with your feet. (I'm saying this to myself more than you all. Mental rehearsal.) 

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I've pondered your last para a while. and I'm a bit concerned abut the "feet' bit. I'd stick to just ailerons which is the best thing to control bank with enough speed there. That's what you must do almost instantly. I don't think I'd like to complicate it by bringing in another control  to deal with if you don't have to.. It's not really like a turn entry. I'd keep rudder central. especially with a bit of "G" on which is commonly the case and you don't want to be crossed up and pulling "G". Nev

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