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2 minutes ago, pmccarthy said:

In the good old days we got all updates by mail, every week or two. A conscientius person (I was back then) would go through all the ring biders and write in the amendments. It was inefficient, but after a while you got to know your way around all the regulations etc.

You still can do that. It will cost you about $3k per year for the privilege, but you can do it.

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Whether it's allowable or not, surely the purpose of recreational aviation is to get AWAY from the kids???

I always believed that a baby could be carried as a 3rd person as long as it was on the lap and does not interfere with controls. If I also believed that I can certainly understand the pilot having th

Well I guess he could say the child is a newborn and his wife went in to expedited labour when the engine failed, was born on descent to the forced landing cleaned up and dressed before touchdown.

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THEY , don,t want you to know it all !?

THATS WHY, THEY employ solicitors And Bureaucrats. 

spacesailor

 

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All aviation within Australia and its territories is governed by the over-arching Civil Aviation Act 1988. The definition of an "aircraft" under Part 1, Sec 3 is;

 

"aircraft means any machine or craft that can derive support in the
atmosphere from the reactions of the air, other than the reactions of
the air against the earth’s surface."

 

This definition covers almost anything that gets airborne - which includes large drones and RA aircraft.

"Registration" of any aircraft is compulsory, and aircraft that are registered carry a visible registration number.

There's practically no exclusions to this, if you want to be legal, you have to register your aircraft - or your large drone (over 250g).

 

The only exclusions to registration of an aircraft is, if your aircraft is a model aircraft or drone, under 250g, and flown for recreation.

Any model aircraft over 250g must be registered with CASA.

 

So to try and say that an RA aircraft is not a registered aircraft, and registration only applies to GA VH aircraft, is not correct.

 

https://www.icao.int/safety/airnavigation/AIG/Database1Docs/Australian Civil Aviation Act 63 1988.pdf

 

 

Edited by onetrack
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IF it can only be Interpreted by LAWYERS why would it be SUITABLE for Pilots as  a source of important information affecting directly the operation  of aircraft.?  By NOT having it in an easily available and  suitable WORKING DOCUMENT, they are involved in a duty of care issue as it directly involves safety. It's not enough to change a CASR without an explanation of intent and purpose and how it will work in practice.. NO ambiguities. No Gotcha's.

 Onetrack they can and do grant exemptions. You'd have to know which ones are in effect.  To put on any display it's most likely exemptions will have to be  granted. There's plenty of examples. A LICENCE was given to a US pilot to permit him to do a display at Avalon when his US one was cancelled. Nev

Edited by facthunter
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Yes Marty. . Barry Diamond was the CASA person .  Good action  in  the circumstances .  I doubt anyone would have the Guts and take such initiative now. Nev

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1 hour ago, facthunter said:

A LICENCE was given to a US pilot to permit him to do a display at Avalon when his US one was cancelled

And I for one are thankful that happened. Really thankful I got a chance to see his routine live. What a legend.

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Where do wing-walkers fit in all of this?

 

wing-walker-alan-raasch.thumb.jpg.24e7e7e4d77ed136c62fc5dd9f0955c0.jpg

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ARO said 

(1B)  Subregulations (1) and (1A) do not apply to prevent a member of the crew having temporary access to:

                     (a)  any part of the aircraft for the purpose of executing repairs or adjustments to the aircraft or its equipment

 

because you wouldn't want to make a rule that would stop people climbing on the wing or undercarriage to make repairs or adjustments in flight!

 

Then this looks like it's legal, per Subsection (1B)

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Gee, you wouldn't want a greasy, slippery palm when you were holding onto that cabin strut, would you? :freaked:

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36 minutes ago, MattP said:

And I for one are thankful that happened. Really thankful I got a chance to see his routine live. What a legend.

Me too; just seeing what that Aero Commander was still capable off after engine cut was a lesson in patience.

 

Having said that, and read his biography he did write off a lot of aircraft over the years, but his knowledge of exactly what each aircraft could do was exquisite. One of the best ones was an engine failure over the mountains where he dived down to build up momentum then pulled up sharply to drop it on a very steep section of scree.

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He even called it his "energy management routine".

I saw him do it at Skyrace Tasmania in the 90's. Met some US airmen the next year and they wanted to go see the airfield he was at- man was a hero to them. 

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Bob Hoover got his Aussie CPL granted at and for the first SKYRACE in Tassie at Valley Field, not for Avalon. I was there to see it. Supposedly he did his whole airshow routine practice with the CAA guy on board beside him on the way back in from his flight test - on the Thursday setup/practice day I think it was. Unbelievable routine. Valley Field was similar viewing to what Reno is - huge mountains in the background. Pity is only lasted two seasons (was it just 2?)

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Not sure if it was 2 or 3.  I went to 2 I think - Chris Sperou accidentally landed his Pitts inverted right in front of me!

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On 26/05/2021 at 9:02 PM, alf jessup said:

Well I guess he could say the child is a newborn and his wife went in to expedited labour when the engine failed, was born on descent to the forced landing cleaned up and dressed before touchdown.

Oh and the child aged a year through the experience of it all.

That should work?

Gee lucky then she didn’t have twins....then he would be for it with CASA! Yeah, love the “minor” engine failure....kind of like a “minor” wing-spar failure!

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The problem was fuel flow related, a blockage in fuel line, filter or venting system. In situations like this the engine will have a good chance of continuing if power is reduced to minimum required. There was insufficient fuel flow available for the full power climb, carbs run low, engine falters.

 

RAAus preliminary report.

26/5/2021 Collaroy Beach NSW Tecnam P2008 Rotax 912 ULS2-01 STATUS: Under review EXTRACT FROM REPORT SUBMISSION: The aircraft took off from Bankstown for a ... 
STATUS: Under review EXTRACT FROM REPORT SUBMISSION: The aircraft took off from Bankstown for a private flight to the northern beaches. About 10 minutes before the incident, they started to fly up the coast, the fuel pressure started to fluctuate and drop and then would increase, the pilot turned the fuel pump on and changed the tank immediately. This did not change the fuel pressure reading, other than this there were no abnormalities. As the aircraft was climbing from 1000ft back to 2400ft to head back to Bankstown, approx. 20 seconds after full power the engine started to drop/ increase/ drop/ increase in RPM. The engine did not stop, but was not operating as normal. The pilot turned back EAST towards the coast and conducted a forced landing on the beach.
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Based on the preliminary report he did exactly the right thing. He may have got back to Bankstown but the risks of that option were too high. Landing on the soft sand with some power assist may have saved the nose leg from collapse.

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fortunately, wasn't a summer's sunday afternoon.

good reason for warning horns ?

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37 minutes ago, RFguy said:

fortunately, wasn't a summer's sunday afternoon.

good reason for warning horns ?

I fitted one that I found on a US boating site; very small, light plastic, with a piercing noise. Wired direct from battery with its own local fuse, so it’s still available during an electrical failure.

My wife ridiculed the angry mosquito sound it made as I flew over our place above 500’ but at least she heard it.

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is it still on the beach ? I was looking for a 912 and put a turbo on it. alas I no longer live at Collaroy.

Edited by RFguy
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That sympton is a fuel blockage...how do I know?...it happened to my aircraft. A small sliver of plastic came off the inside wall of the plastic tanks and jammed itself into the metal feed pipe to the gascolator and restricted the flow to the carbs. At full power you had about 3 mins until the carbs drained then the engine carried on like a pork chop. reducing the throttle to around 4000 rpm the engine ran fine. Took a while to find the issue.  Who would have thought a small piece of tank plastic would have actually came away from a rotomolded tank

 

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anyone ever see a clear/transparent float bowl for the Bing ?

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Doesn't take much. Sliver of metal from a new thread. Tiny bit of rubber from cutting the hose. 

 Answer to the clear bowl on the carb.  Never to the float bowl but have had a clear bowl filter near the gascolator. That's model aeroplane stuff. Being able to drain the float bowl is a good idea though. How about undoing the lower connections and checking flow rate now and again? I do it on old bikes regularly as well as off road ones. Nev

Edited by facthunter
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Mark, what orifice  ID and what size bit debris ? Maybe I need to take one apart to understand the ease this can happen. I was going to say "understand the gravity" but that would be a little pun-ish.

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