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What do people "really think" of BFR's in RAA A. Helpful or B. Waste of Time and Money ?


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I have been flying for over 30 years. Still alive. 

I have never had a CFI ever say anything that I was doing wrong. (except they like to fly at this airspeed on downwind or finals or they like to have cruise power set at this number etc)  All totally personal preferences of the Gods. ( Not having a go any any single CFI ). Never learned or was told anything new.  

This question is really for those who have been flying a while, not new pilots. 

Do we need BFR's and do they do anything for pilots that say fly 50 hours plus a year except cost money and time.

I am Not saying that for the guys that do say 10 hours or 15 hours a year for example that may need some practice - but they should know that themselves.

How many of you feel they are required or should be optional with 50 ish hours flown a year. 

Not looking to get into a GA vs RAA question - This is a strictly RAA BFR question. 

On topic answers welcome.  And your personal experience and reasons - Please.

  

 

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It is possible for somebody to develop bad habits they are not aware of and if left unchecked could result in a disaster. By having a BFR the instructor might pick that up and say "Jeez, you should st

During a BFR the PIC is the Instructor so if you crash the instructor has failed. Other than that you cannot fail a BFR but the instructor can decide not to sign you off until you have improved on som

I would be in favor of a system similar to the FAA wings program. Basically if you attend approved courses / seminars / flight training then it extends your BFR by a certain amount per course. The ide

It is possible for somebody to develop bad habits they are not aware of and if left unchecked could result in a disaster. By having a BFR the instructor might pick that up and say "Jeez, you should stop doing that before you kill yourself". One may also get rusty in a particular area, say, forced landings and the instructor may pick up on that. I sure think that BFRs are a good thing. Maybe we should do it for driver's licences so dickheads learn to indicate when leaving a roundabout and not changing lanes in a roundabout?

Edited by Jabiru7252
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I found all my GA BFR were fairly mundane, depending on the CFI you got at the time. I did my conversion to an RAA certificate the first BFR I had in RAA was fantastic. Did it in my own aircraft came away knowing my aircraft a lot more than I previously did. Actually due in March for my BFR looking forward to it. Ill be in touch soon Bruce!

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I like doing it because besides the basics, he puts me through my passes with many different scenarios and I am pushed. I love it. As XAIRVTW said, doing it my own aircraft is good for familiararity.

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As an advocate of BDR's (biennial or at least every 5 years, driving reviews) I am also a supporter of the BFR - nothing like having a fresh pair of eyes on your performance, to bring you up to speed. Then there are all those little changes, that the authorities like to introduce - your instructor should be able to clarify/explain any lack of understanding. I always feel that its money well spent.

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3 hours ago, Jabiru7252 said:

"Jeez, you should stop doing that before you kill yourself". 

That would be his/her last flight with me.

 

Sending subliminal messages about killing/dying is very rude in my books. There are other and better ways to correct/overstress whatever bad behaviour/habbit is in question. 

 

I do have regular friendly flights with other pilots as well as instructors to confirm that my skills are still current. I also pickup their habits as learning is two-way street, we all  learn from each other, and it never stops.

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When I was learning to fly I couldn't wait to be free of the instructor's yoke.
Been flying 10 years+ and I actually look forward to flying with an instructor for my BFRs.
1) I expect them to pick up on any bad habits I've developed.
2) It forces me to practice a forced landing, which I avoid doing because it gives me the shivers.
3) Flying with a very experienced pilot is like having a security blanket. It's one of the few times I can totally relax in the cockpit.

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There's the BFR, and then there's the practising for the BFR. The whole process has got to sharpen a pilot's skills.

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RAAus BFR = WOFTAM.

 

GA BFR with a decent instructor = good value & worthwhile.

 

I have not done a RAAus BFR that was challenging or from which I took anything significant away. But a GA BFR where you are placed under the hood and have to maintain S&L, execute a level 180 or climbing 180 to a specific heading, go through CTA that you normally wouldn't or properly use the P charts to work out if you can get in or out of a particular strip is good value.

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1 hour ago, cscotthendry said:


3) Flying with a very experienced pilot is like having a security blanket. It's one of the few times I can totally relax in the cockpit.

This comment reminded me of the time I took an airline check pilot for a fly in my Zephyr - all god (bit heavy on the controls but so what) until came time to land - had to make the PIC decision to take over - nuff said.

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I look foward to the flight review because I would like to keep sharp and not develop any bad / lazy habits. I should mention that I have absolute respect for the CFI. The flight review process can be used to gain knowledge or practice in any aera that you want and does not have to follow any set formula. I have about 2500 hrs. all private flying but still feel that I can get benefit from a review.

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My instructor gave me heaps of confidence,

BUT  ( always a But ) !.

When taking my flight test the senior instructor knocked it all out of me, never so nervous in the Foxbat even on my First day.

Light weight in the right seat & I lost a few kilos, so he said " I took of too fast ".

Different  words than what was used by my flight instructor, so did a touch&go instead of what he wanted. He told me I,m wasting his time & my money.

SO 

Failed

spacesailor

 

 

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You can't fail a BFR - it's not an exam. If you instructor deems your flying unsafe he might suggest a few hours with an instructor before you take up passengers etc. I was once told to 'work on your forced landings'.

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21 minutes ago, spacesailor said:

When taking my flight test the senior instructor knocked it all out of me, never so nervous in the Foxbat even on my First day.

What an absolute WANKER, I’d definitely be taking my money elsewhere, that’s totally unacceptable behavior for an instructor & I’d recommend you put in a formal complaint. 

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No

Just walked away and Never flew again !.

I really miss my flying.

Had a few overseas trips with the money that was intended for flying.

spacesailor

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12 minutes ago, spacesailor said:

Just walked away and Never flew again !.

Mate I’m so sorry that you were treated so poorly, there’s always a few bad apples, people with egos, an agenda or a shortfall of character that slip through the cracks, it’s never too late to start again, wish you well.

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Plenty of exaggerated ego's in flying. . IF you get the right person, you should get benefit from every flight assessment you do. When you are doing the paying He/She should always be polite , considerate of your feelings and patient They should be like that anyhow but especially when you are paying good money.

Don't seek a mates deal, (an easy run) and seek and value  constructive and fair criticism..  Nev

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I have done a few GA BFRs and a few less RAAus or AUF  BFRs.

Flying a single seat RAAus plane I either did a check flight with an instructor watching, or I flew a different aeroplane.

Flying my plane with an instructor watching didn't really do me any good. Flying a new to me plane did seem to work as I had the instructor watching beside me.

Once when asked to do a stall I took a Jabiru into a falling leaf and the instructor commented that I had lost height. My response "I was just enjoying myself"

My problem was that instructors wanted to hear my thoughts and I kept them to myself.

GA BFRs are in my opinion better, but I never did them in my own plane, because the passenger seat didn't have dual controls. I did one once in a Cessna and after being told to break away from a simulated engine failure at about 200' above GL, the instructors only comment was that I lifted the flaps a bit quickly. I was aware of that problem and there was no risk of a stall in my opinion. The last one I did was mainly instrument flying and as neither of my planes was equipped for instrument flying and I hadn't done any since the early seventies I was apprehensive. After nearly an hour under the hood I came out lathered in sweat and exhilarated. Great fun.

So I reckon RAAus not much advantage and GA well worth it.

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9 hours ago, old man emu said:

There's the BFR, and then there's the practising for the BFR. The whole process has got to sharpen a pilot's skills.

Great point OME,

 

Had a BFR after 10 months not flying,  I was going to take an instructor for a flight anyway so thought I would kill two birds with the one stone.

 

I usually go for a fly and practice the week before a BFR and get my head around it all.

 

Enough said, was a pretty average example of flying ( well landing ! ) . The pressure of the BFR and lack of hands on flying knocked a big hole in my confidence !

 

After a couple of circuits it all came back, if I had my time over again I would have gone for a few circuits the week before with an instructor  and enjoyed the practice.

 

 

Edited by Butch
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I would be in favor of a system similar to the FAA wings program. Basically if you attend approved courses / seminars / flight training then it extends your BFR by a certain amount per course. The idea is to promote further learning not to simply pass a test flight every 2 years. Anything that promotes learning and self improvment has to be the way to go.

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I had my first training flight,

Over

Sixty years ago !, AirTrainingCorps at 15.

AND

Still haven t got a licence.

Never mind I.ll thry again NEXT YEAR !.

spacesailor

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