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Me??? too many projects at once...I see something that needs a better approach and want to modify it to make it better be it mechanical or electronic...You may have gathered this within my builds on here and other things. I do a lot of radio and electronic stuff at home and work. Sorting out our farm especially seeing I have always for most of my life been a city boy not a country one. So learning heaps about looking after a farm and all the pletherer of things that go with that. I enjoy working with my hands and brain a lot. Keeps me interested although sometimes it not good when stuff is rattling around inside the old noggin and you know you need to be going to sleep.

But I suppose my main interest is building aircraft as it has a lot of all the things I like to do within the whole project from start to finish. A lot of this leads off to things like lathe work and my CNC machine learning 3D software for the CNC everything seems to have a tangent that interests me. My biggest problem is I am running out of time :(

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Our Keith Page https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2020-10-01/backyard-aquaponics-yields-abundance-of-fish-and-veggies/12691888  

Looks like some of you Guys get some pleasure from typing too! ??

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The stories of people saving machine tools really inspire me. I am fortunate to live near Castlemaine Vic where there are many businesses running with old machines that allow us to get almost anything repaired or reproduced. I recently discovered another such workshop full of specialist machines that has been less than 10km from me for 25 years. Even more important, we have people who know how to use them.

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Next urgent project is restoration of a Rockmaster twin-ram posthole digger. Just about finished restoration of the frame and hydraulic cylinders this week, the gearbox is next for attention.

My first job was in their drawing office in Adelaide. My mentor was Paddy Baker who either invented the swing saw, or got in early and supplied most of the eastern market.

The achilles heel of the Rockmaster is that the crown wheel sits on a phosphor bronze bearing and the shaft is all that stops it rocking.

When you hit a lump of rock, of which there's plenty under in the ground in SA the crown wheel grabs and tilts and the pinion starts to come out of mesh and break teeth.

I left there at 18 to set up a drilling business and designed my own gearbox using a heavy angular contact bearing top and bottom and never had a problem after that.

Paddy also designed a hydraulic wool press which sold very well.

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Wow you guys! I relate to most of your posts!

Last time I worked it out, I had 20 years of projects on my ( mental ) list and about 5 years of life to achieve them all. ( 74 now)

And there are so many jobs need doing on a farm... like picking up the fallen branches and making them into bonfires. And there are the broken fence top-wires which I think the kangaroos do, not that I have actually seen it happen. I reckon a little flag of aluminium foil tape might help those roos see the top wire better.

Then there is the veggie garden, the home-made wind generator and all the building jobs the wife needs done. Plus the farm buggy which I am converting to electric. Not to mention the model planes... the latest thing is a telemetry audio vario to make it easier to use thermals. I am half-way through mastering this.

Also there is the Edenhope men's shed I need to get active with. I have never had a real good woodworking bench and that project beckons too.

Then there is this site to keep up with. Only recently I have got the idea of just how to lube the control-surface hinges ( teflon or Moly disulphide in isopropyl alcohol brushed on ). Gosh there is a lot of good technical stuff here. Most of you guys leave me for dead when it comes to engines, and that's great.

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Well I like working with wood. I love making things out of wood, all sorts of things. A particular interest for quite a while was musical instruments, especially ancient ones. So I've built a harpsichord and a clavichord (antique keyboard instruments, both from kits believe it or not), a replica baroque lute, a couple of more modern-design classical guitars, and a violin (also from a kit). I tend to be much more of a builder than a player, so all of these instruments have been sold except for the first classical guitar and the lute. Other non-musical things include a cedar-strip sea kayak (sold only a few months ago because I wasn't using it enough), a pair of jarrah glass doors in my house between the entry and the lounge (plus the frame), some custom modular furniture to fit into a corner in the lounge, and a window seat in a bay window.

 

In line with this same theme, when I was able to consider aircraft ownership way back around 1990, I was quite keen to build my own. And the one that really appealed was - some of you will have guessed it - the Falco, because it's made largely of wood. And it's a very pretty and fast design too. As it happened I didn't build my own, because I decided I'd rather be out flying than building for the next X years, where X is unknown but probably greater than 3! I think it was the right decision, borne out by things I've read since about the Falco being a very complex aircraft to build. Nowadays I salivate over the Falcomposite Furio from NZ, a sort of 21st-century composite take on the Falco. But alas, my financial position now does not even allow flying, let alone ownership.

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What are you growing Sue? Jackfruit? Mangosteen? Lychee? Longan?

Just about anything that thrives in the sub-tropics - Mango (3 varieties), Lychee, bananas (3 varieties), Guava (6 varieties), plum (4), peach, grumachama, Brazilian cherry, jackfruit (2), jaboticaba, 5 star fruit (carambola), Lonergan, Ceylon cherry, Citrus - Lemons (4), lemonade, mandarin (3), oranges (3 - Cara Cara, navels, Valencias), Lime, Kafia Lime, figs, Sugar plum, Black Sapote, persimmon, pomegranate, loquat (3), apple (3), medlar, bunya nut, macadamia nut, Saba nut/ Malabar chestnut, pecan nut, dragon fruit (3), lily-pilly, Burdekin plum, Quandong, passionfruit, Giant Granadilla, Cape Gooseberry, strawberry, mulberry, grapes etc. I grow a lot of vegetables. We have 86 acres with 30 & 2.5 acre cropping areas and 2.5 acres of orchard & lots of sheds.

 

We need lots of sheds because Mr FV thinks he is living another 400 years and has lined the jobs up accordingly. He is currently restoring a 1951 Oliver Clertac dozer, a Cat 112F grader, David Brown 885 Tractor, trying to rebuild the motorcycle he got smashed up on in 1991 (he breaks nearly every bone, every 30 years and is now half metal - but not worth $6million!). Plenty of planes to finish building, repairing, hangars needing repair, equipment, etc. He just loves junk and the house, sheds etc are chokkers with things that don't work, will never work (analogue mobiles & TVs), are surplus, have been dumped on us by his sons (car bodies, dead HWS, rusted guttering....) can't part with anything! My father would periodically take stock, and decide that "this stuff is costing too much", whereas Mr FV will gladly build another $20,000 shed to house $100 worth of rust and spent about $30k moving all the junk (about 60 trips truck & trailer over 5 years) to the new farm. Bless him!

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And another thing, way out of left field for this forum: way back in 2004 I stumbled by chance across the story of a bloke named John Cyril Hawes, an English Catholic priest who lived and worked in the midwest region of WA from 1915 to 1939. Before entering the church he had qualified as an architect, and the bishop of the time tempted him here with a promise that he could design a cathedral for the town of Geraldton. This he did, along with many other buildings thoughout the region - mostly churches but also a farm homestead at Melangata (75km north of Yalgoo), and a cottage in Geraldton. There are about 25 buildings or bits of buildings left in WA, ranging geographically from Carnarvon in the north to Bindoon in the south. I'm not a Catholic, not even a church-goer, but the more I learned about this guy, the more captivated I was by the remarkable life he led.

 

He was brought up an Anglican, and was initially ordained into the Anglican church in 1903, very soon after being accepted into the architectural profession. He had already built his first design, a quirky little house in Bognor Regis, for himself and his two brothers to use as a holiday house. His first church commission was in the village of Gunnerton, way up in Northumberland. In 1909-10 he was sent to The Bahamas, to help with recovery from a massive hurricane they had in 1908. So there are many buildings, renovations and extensions designed by him in those distant islands. He left The Bahamas after struggling for many years with his beliefs, and deciding that he had to convert to Catholicism. He did this at a place called Graymoor just outside New York City, and several years of personal and spiritual upheaval followed. Finally he entered Beda College in Rome to study for the priesthood again, and was ordained a Catholic priest in 1915. It was there and then that he was recruited by the Bishop Of Geraldton, who was there to try and find priests to help him run his huge diocese in Western Australia.

 

There are several books about John Hawes - two biographies, and an in-depth study of his architecture by Perth heritage architect John Taylor. Soon after becoming aware of all this, I decided to start building a portfolio of photographs of the WA buildings, with a view to producing a pictorial book, something that seemed to me to be conspicuously missing. I did that in 2012, and sumbitted it to several publishers. All of them said thanks but no thanks. I couldn't afford to finance a print run myself, so I laid out the book myself and made it available through one of the online photobook services. Although that was OK, it made the book way too expensive, so it didn't really go anywhere much. And I thought that was that.

 

Since the beginning the idea was always in the back of my mind that it would be great to go the UK and The Bahamas to photograph the buildings Hawes left in those countries, and then produce a more complete book. But as my age increased and my income did the opposite, I had pretty much given up on the idea. Then in late 2017, I heard (again by chance) that a group of Geraldton people were putting together a tour that would do exactly that - it was even called In the Footsteps of John Hawes. We signed up and headed off in May-June 2018, and what an amazing experience it was! The group of 17 "pilgrims" were treated almost like celebrities nearly everywhere we went, especially The Bahamas. We still didn't visit absolutely every building John Hawes left, but I had no control over the itinerary so we had to take it as it was. There are 3 or 4 in The Bahamas that we didn't get to. The tour allowed me to build a new edition of the book, and this time I have bitten the bullet and done a print run, and the new book is only about 25% of the price of the first one.

 

Sorry to be a bit long-winded, but you did ask.... This has kept me fascinated for over 15 years now, and the main purpose of my book is to raise awareness of this remarkable man, the life he led and the architectural legacy he has left us. In my view this is a significant and colourful strand in the history and heritage of WA.

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Well done, Marshallarts! I'm surprised Hesperian Press didn't take on the publishing of your book, they specialise in W.A. history and small print runs, and they have produced a lot of publications that fill in history gaps in W.A.

 

I particularly like the historical publications of the small towns in W.A., whereby the stories are related of the founding of towns, plus the early tribulations and personal stories of the area, I find them quite entertaining.

 

An associate has been writing the history of H. J. Wigmore, and Wigmores Tractors, the first and the exclusive dealer for Caterpillar in W.A., from around 1925.

He's been writing these two books since not long after he retired, and he's now 80, and still not finished!

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Thanks Onetrack. I didn't try Hesperian, don't think I came across them when I was looking. I did try Fremantle Press, because they also do a lot of WA history - it took them about 8 months to get around to saying no! Anyway, I didn't even try publishers with the new edition - I have now self-published this one, so it does exist! I hope I'm not contravening any rules of this forum by saying that if anyone would like to purchase a copy they can of of course contact me. The book is also on sale at the small heritage centre/museum next to the cathedral in Geraldton.

 

I should also have mentioned that the Geraldton Cathedral has recently undergone a huge restoration, which took about 4 years and over $9 million. It has repaired the inevitable wear and tear of just over a century of use, and brought some aspects of it more into line with Hawes' original specification. Its construction was fraught with all sorts of financial and political issues and took a very long time, and when it was first opened many things had been skimped on or omitted because of cost and to just get the thing finished. It has always been a wonderful building, in a quaint sort of way. But since the restoration it is a wonderful building in a quite magnificent way. It is a reason to visit Geraldton, if it wasn't before. So if anyone is going through Geraldton, I urge you to go and have a look over the cathedral - even do a guided tour, which will help them a bit with the upkeep.

 

The last major component of the restoration was a new carillon of bells, one of the biggest and most sophisticated in the southern hemisphere. The technicalities of this will probably appeal to some on here: there are 27 bells, so about two and a half octaves, tuned to modern concert pitch. The bells can be played from the organ consoles inside the cathedral, or via a wireless keyboard more or less anywhere in the vicinity. They can also be played via the internet - I hope they have good passwords on that! And the ring patterns can be pre-programmed for anything up to a year ahead of time. There are no bell-ropes, they are all sounded by electro-mechanical clappers. Several of the larger bells came from a deconsecrated church in England, and some of those bells were originally cast in the 12th century. The rest were newly cast especially for Geraldton, and we actually saw them in the bell foundry in Loughborough in England during the 2018 tour - one of the highlights of the trip, for me anyway. The bells were financed by the community of Geraldton - people were invited to "buy a bell", then they could specify a name to be engraved on it. And in a really nice touch, the biggest bell in the set was paid for out of the restoration fund and dedicated to John Hawes himself, as if he had donated it. It has "Monsignor J C Hawes" engraved on it. The installation and commissioning of the system was delayed many times, and ended up being completed in November last year, about a year later than originally planned/hoped. You can't hurry bell-makers!

Cheers, Steve.

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Both my aircraft and flying are just one hobby of mine for my retirement, along with sailing my small trailer sailer (8 meters) fishing in my quintrex hornet (4.3), and a little hooka diving in it, heavy caliber pistol shooting, heavy caliber rifle shooting, blackpowder pistol and rifle shooting, shotgun field shooting, hunting and freshwater fishing. And ahead of it all family and grandkids of course. I probably have too many hobbies but its all religon belief based ( you only have one life and this is it eh) cheers Mick

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My main hobby nowadays is collecting old computer games and building my own arcade machines. Ive lost count but I have at least a dozen consoles ranging from Atari 2600 to PlayStation PS3. And hundreds of games, most of which I've never played ? but it certainly give me something to do when I retire.

 

Also have maybe eight CRT televisions for the consoles although I got a custom chassis for one and turned it into an arcade monitor (the tubes are the same, but they run at different frequencies) . That monitor went into my upright arcade machine, which I call 'meet George Jetson' and my cocktail cab runs a CRT PC monitor which rotates for horizontal or vertical games, thus always running in full screen ?

 

I also used to be interested in building 1/72 scale models but my eyes ain't what they used to be. If I ever get the time I'll get into 1/24 cars instead, something Ive wanted to do since I was a kid but couldn't afford. Hence 1/72 was what I built

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Out of curiousity what other things are you guys interested in like Cars, Boats, Gardening, Technology, Jobs, Home Maintenance ?????????????????

I wonder if anyone goes or has gone to Archerfield to watch the Sprint Car racing? I have been but as I don't drive it is too far to go to..

I used to watch the stock cars at Racewall Cowdenbeath.. At one time my daughter raced minis and latterly Pro stocks.. A Vauxhall saloon. Roll cage. No engine modifications..race harness. Front and rear bars Window net etc. As it could be quite a contact sport.. Just thought I'd throw this in..

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Looks like some of you Guys get some pleasure from typing too! ??

I thought the same??

My ex bro in-law used to have a Sonata 6 I think it was called, fun little boat?

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Many think and tell me I've had an interesting life but I've found it a bit boring and mundane. Do ALL you can, It's not a dress rehearsal. The DECISION is the hard part and don't just follow the herd.. Doing your own thing is cheaper as "the system" hasn't yet got control of it.. Perhaps do what YOU want not what "THEY" will approve of so much.. It's not about things that you can just BUY. That's too easy to be an answer.. How YOU interact with it and the people also involved is what matters.. Nev

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I was told that I had an interesting life so I have written a small book for the family. About my side of the family and my own life. All ready to get printed and I will soon see what sort of reception it gets. After writing it I realised that I had left out big lumps of info, which I had really deemed to be un interesting. Things like hanging off the end of a rope, cutting tree limbs off while held on a crane over a house. All forbidden now by workplace health and safety.

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My other interests include electronics and computers. Spent the last 40 plus years in the industry. When I retire I'll dabble in chemical engineering and experiment with converting alcohol into urine.

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I wonder if anyone goes or has gone to Archerfield to watch the Sprint Car racing? I have been but as I don't drive it is too far to go to..

I used to watch the stock cars at Racewall Cowdenbeath.. At one time my daughter raced minis and latterly Pro stocks.. A Vauxhall saloon. Roll cage. No engine modifications..race harness. Front and rear bars Window net etc. As it could be quite a contact sport.. Just thought I'd throw this in..

Also I cycle a lot.. As I don't drive. I particularly enjoy cycling to military jetty most days..

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Definitely great advice, Bushy!

 

I have a short concentration span, flitting from one project to another. While this means my bedside table has half a dozen books I'm part way thru, our place is littered with not-quite-finished stone walls, partly-repaired items and SWMBO has a queue of jobs for me; it also enriches my existence.

 

To keep my body functional without overloading it, the backyard is my gymnasium: I can swing a pick, do a few minutes of shovelling, carry some concrete blocks or rocks, get in some tai-chi with the whipper-snipper.

 

Never waste a trip up and down the paddock; drag a load of garden prunings to the bonfire, carry up a load of firewood and attack it with the block splitter.

 

My office desk is a gymnasium for my mind, with several projects on the go.

 

I depend too much on this 8-year-old iPad and this forum as my social gymnasium.

Snap! you have described my lifestyle to perfection. The multiple concurrent projects, the computer hidden amongst all the other info being processed, the several books being read concurrently (always last thing before lights out), the firewood routine - we planted a woodlot of 260 trees back in 1992 to keep us in firewood for space heating and hot water in winter. Old adage:- cut your own firewood and it will warm you twice. It works.

 

We have in the past camped as neighbours at Narromine and Temora, but I don't think we have ever talked. How about a flying trip to my home airport at Pt. Pirie? We'll put you up and are sure to have a conversation starter.

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...Old adage:- cut your own firewood and it will warm you twice. It works...

I hadn't heard that one Bushie, but it's so true!

 

...We have in the past camped as neighbours at Narromine and Temora, but I don't think we have ever talked. How about a flying trip to my home airport at Pt. Pirie? We'll put you up and are sure to have a conversation starter.

Love to, but are you sure you want refugees coming from the contaminated eastern states?

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Building motor-homes , the one in the avata is number two have built two since .

At the present we have a 21'.6" caravan suitable modified to suit our needs .

And of-cause traveling the best country in the world .

Bernie .

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I hadn't heard that one Bushie, but it's so true!

 

 

Love to, but are you sure you want refugees coming from the contaminated eastern states?

No problem, if the dog's sniff test clears you. She's the boss here after all.

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I was musing over my lifestyle recently.

 

Although I'm over 70, I still run with the dog for 5 km every morning. After a cold shower and a breakfast of muesli and fruit tea, I cook 20 meals for the homeless and deliver them to the hostel. Then I work out in the gym for an hour or two.

Alternate days I am rebuilding a 1939 Morgan trike, or restoring a 1944 J3 Cub. Then it's flying most evenings at sunset, coming home to work on my Phd on philosophy. Then I retire to bed with my young wife, where we make passionate love, often several times.

 

It is usually about this point that I wake up, throw another log on the woodburner, and go back to my afternoon nap.

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One of my heroes is Ron Fitch, born in 1910. He was the West Australian Govt Railways first tertiary-qualified engineer. He started as a cadet with the WAGR in 1927 and gained a Masters in Civil Engineering in 1949.

He left the WAGR in May 1949 to become Chief Civil Engineer of the Commonwealth Railways, which comprised the Trans-Australian Railway, the Central Australia Railway, and the North Australia Railway.

 

He became Commissioner of the South Australian Railways in 1966, and retired in 1973 after 46 years of railways service. He then went on to write several books about Australian Railways, and became a noted railways author and historian.

Then, obviously bored, he studied and gained a PhD - at the age of 92! Aged 100, he was lecturing on aged care! He finally died at age 105 in July 2015. But he didn't have to service a young wife, so maybe there's some pointers there. :cheezy grin:

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